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Views over Agadir, Morocco
Views over Agadir, Morocco | © Michel Terrier / Wikimedia Commons

The Most Trendy Neighbourhoods in Agadir

Picture of Sarah Williams
Updated: 28 December 2017
Planning a trip to Agadir? Known for its excellent surfing conditions, laid-back beach life, and exciting nightlife, this large coastal city has several cool neighbourhoods to discover. Here are some of the best.

Downtown

Also referred to as the Touristic Zone, Downtown Agadir sits at the northern end of Agadir Beach. It’s where you’ll find the Museum of Amazigh Culture, the bird park of Vallee des Oiseaux, Shems Casino, and other attractions. There are many hotels and resorts, as well as diverse restaurants, bars, and nightclubs.

Miami Disco in Agadir’s main tourist area
Miami Disco in Agadir’s main tourist area | © Dan Lundberg / Flickr</a>

Anza

North of Downtown Agadir, Anza Beach is great for surfing and sunbathing. There are public art installations along the beach front and you’ll find a good selection of places to eat, drink, and shop.

Moroccan salad and fresh orange juice overlooking the waves
Moroccan salad and fresh orange juice overlooking the waves | © Heather Cowper / Heather on her Travels</a>

Swiss Village

Bordered by streets with impressive official buildings, the charming Swiss Village is a largely residential area with lovely villas. It is the city’s oldest villa neighbourhood.

Marina Agadir

A magnet for Agadir’s wealthy youth, you’ll spot many luxury cars and sailing vessels around the marina. The area offers great views of the hill with its inscription and there are boutique shops, fancy restaurants, quaint cafés, and ice cream shops.

Agadir Marina, Morocco
Agadir Marina, Morocco | © Grigory Gusev / Flickr

Agadir Oufella

Agadir Oufella is the large hill that looks over the beach and city. One of the city’s oldest districts and home to the kasbah, little of it now remains. Built in the 1570s and partly restored following the earthquake, the high fortress walls contain just foundations today. The high point offers terrific sweeping views and you can take a camel ride here.

Camel in front of the old walls at Agadir Oufella
Camel in front of the old walls at Agadir Oufella | © PIVISO</a>

Founty

At the southern end of Agadir Beach, Founty is home to many of the city’s higher-end beach resorts. This is where you’ll find the city’s two Sofitel resorts, the luxurious Hotel Palace des Roses, the high-class Hotel Iberostar Founty Beach, and the boutique Riad Villa Blanche, among others. Several resorts have excellent spas, and there are also great dining options in this part of town. There are opulent villas and holiday homes, and Agadir’s Royal Palace is also in Founty.

Sunset in Agadir
Sunset in Agadir | © Hugues / Flickr</a>

Haut Founty

Moving inland, Haut Founty has several shopping centres and a number of smaller and relaxed accommodation options. There are plenty of cafés in the area, and you can stock up on supplies at the large Marjane supermarket. It has a modern appearance.

Bensergao

The beautiful replica of Agadir Medina is located on the fringes of the Bensergao neighbourhood. Constructed by an Italian-Moroccan architect, Agadir Medina lets visitors see how Agadir looked before being devastated by an earthquake. Expert artisans and craftspeople created an inviting place for shopping, eating, and exploring. It’s a major attraction in Agadir and this rural neighbourhood is also home to several local mosques and a park.

Arched walkway through Agadir Medina
Arched walkway through Agadir Medina | © Anthere / Wikimedia Commons</a>

Talborjt

Talborjt was destroyed in the large earthquake of the 1960s. When the city was rebuilt, the name was given to another district of Agadir, although it is not in the same location as the original neighbourhood of that name. The name means ‘Small Tower’ in the Amazigh language. A lively area that is popular with both tourists and locals, the neighbourhood is home to the large Mohammed V Mosque, the Memorial d’Agadir Museum, and Olhao Garden. It’s a good place to get a glimpse of traditional local life and see several local landmarks.

Mohammed V Mosque in Agadir, Morocco
Mohammed V Mosque in Agadir, Morocco | © Rudko / Wikimedia Commons</a>

Abbatoir

Abbatoir is the city’s industrial heart. It makes the list of best neighbourhoods, though, because this is where you’ll find the enormous Souk El Had. The walled market has thousands of stalls to browse and it’s Agadir’s finest souk. Abbatoir sits between the city and the suburbs, with its lively bus- and taxi-filled square, a bridge between different parts of Agadir.

Colourful olives in Souk El Had, Agadir
Colourful olives in Souk El Had, Agadir | © Paola Sucato / Flickr</a>

The large Adrar Stadium can be found in Imounsiss and the airport is between La Pergola and Stylia 2. Outside of Agadir proper, Taghazout, Tamraght, and Imsouane offer great surfing, and Paradise Valley is a picturesque mountain valley. Day trips to further-out spots will add more diversity to your stay in Agadir.