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Kungsleden | © Carl Jansson/Flickr
Kungsleden | © Carl Jansson/Flickr

8 Epic Views in Sweden You Have to Hike to Get To

Picture of Judi Lembke
Updated: 20 November 2017

Sweden is blessed with stunning natural beauty and its diverse landscape makes it a hikers paradise. So if finding epic views while hiking is your thing, then you’ve come to the right place.

Kungsleden

The King’s Trail is one of Sweden’s most popular hiking trails. It stretches over a distance of approximately 440 km, and passes through the Vindelfjällen Nature Reserve, one of Europe’s largest protected areas.

 

Höga Kusten

The High Coast Trail takes you through forests and pastures, along cliffs, rocky coastal areas and sleepy villages and national parks. It is a UNESCO World Heritage site for a reason.

Skåneleden

This trail is a long-distance footpath that covers more than 1000 km. It’s divided into five separate trails, with 89 sections, and is much lusher than the trails up north.

The Arctic Trail

The 800 km Arctic Trail will take you through Sweden, Finland, and Norway, and is one of the most stunning hiking routes in the world. Don’t forget to pack warmly and wisely as this trail can be demanding.

 

Upplandsleden

A more gentle ramble is what you’ll get over this well-marked trail, which is not too far from Stockholm. It was first opened in 1980.

 

Kebnekaise

Kebnekaise is the highest peak in Sweden and it’s definitely not for the faint at heart. Pack plenty of water, check the weather, and make sure someone knows you’re going!

Finnskogleden

This 240 km trail is divided into 15 stages, and will take you across the Swedish-Norwegian border several times. Chances are you’ll spot wildlife along the way, so be prepared.

Padjelanta Trail

This 150 km long trail goes through the Padjelanta Natural Park, which is a part of the World Heritage Laponian Area. A number of cottage sites can be found along the path to provide accommodation for visitors.