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The stone tree | © capobleu2a/pixabay
The stone tree | © capobleu2a/pixabay
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20 Must-Visit Attractions in Bolivia

Picture of Harry Stewart
Updated: 29 January 2017
This largely undiscovered country is just starting to gain international recognition as a must-visit tourist destination – and for good reason. Bolivia has plenty in store for the curious traveler. Marvel at the surreal landscapes of the Salar de Uyuni, conquer some of the most beautiful mountains on Earth, fish for piranha deep in the Amazon rainforest or pave your own way through a land whose indigenous inhabitants still cling to the fascinating traditions of a bygone era.

La Paz

Very few people come to Bolivia without spending at least a day or two in the world’s highest (administrative) capital. Besides having a myriad of things to see and do, it serves as the perfect jumping off point for other attractions in the country.

La Paz | © Jan Beck/Flickr
La Paz | © Jan Beck/Flickr

Cochabamba

The gastronomic center of Bolivia, Cochabamba is famous for serving huge portions of the country’s finest cuisine. It also happens to have a perfect year-round climate, a thriving cultural scene and plenty of stunning nature reserves right on its doorstep.

Cochabamba | © Jan Beck/Flickr
Cochabamba | © Jan Beck/Flickr

Santa Cruz

Bolivia’s economic powerhouse tends to be largely overlooked by travelers. While this rapidly expanding city doesn’t have many tourist attractions itself, venture a few hours beyond its borders and you’ll find captivating sand dunes, rainforests, rivers and waterfalls. You might even see a sloth casually hanging out in one of its central plazas.

Sloth | © Manuel Menal/Flickr
Sloth | © Manuel Menal/Flickr

Tarija

Upon visiting Tarija, not far from the border with Argentina, many might wonder if they are still in Bolivia. This laid back, Mediterranean-style town features whitewashed colonial architecture, a thriving wine industry and a noticeable Argentine cultural influence.

Tarija | © Russland345 / Wikipedia
Tarija | © Russland345 / Wikipedia

Tupiza

Apart from being an alternative starting point for the Salar de Uyuni tour, Tupiza is also a terrific spot to spend a couple of days. Its surrounding badlands feature impressive canyons, rivers and valleys, which are perfect for exploring on a guided horseback tour. Reminiscent of the wild west, these are the lands where Butch Cassidy met his fateful end.

Tupiza badlands | © Jan Beck/Flickr
Tupiza badlands | © Jan Beck/Flickr

Potosi

The former economic center of the Spanish empire, Potosi used to be one of the biggest cities in the world due to its silver-rich Cerro Rico (Rich Mountain). These days, a visit to Potosi provides a fascinating insight into Spanish Colonialism and mining history. Many travelers join a guided tour to gain firsthand experience of the horrendous working conditions in the country’s most notorious mine.

Potosi | © Anthony Tong Lee/Flickr
Potosi | © Anthony Tong Lee/Flickr

Sucre

Bolivia’s official capital and colonial centerpiece manages to charm even the most weary traveler. Its delightful array of whitewashed churches, government buildings, parks and monasteries entices many a visitor to stay longer than originally intended. It’s also the best place to learn Spanish in South America, with numerous high-quality yet inexpensive language schools to choose from.

Sucre | © TomaB/Flickr
Sucre | © TomaB/Flickr

Oruro

Oruro hosts one of the continent’s best carnival parades. Tens of thousands of intricately-dressed dancers strut their stuff down Oruro’s main streets to the infectious rhythm of exuberant marching bands. It’s a loud, outrageous and refreshingly unpretentious alternative to Rio de Janeiro’s carnival.

© Harry Stewart
Oruro carnival | © Harry Stewart

La Cordillera Real

Meaning the ‘Royal Range’ in English, this spectacular Andean mountain range earned its name for one simple reason – it’s truly majestic. Every year, hordes of climbers come from all over the world to conquer the snowy peaks of this wondrous region.

Mountain Climbing | © Unsplash/pixabay
Mountain Climbing | © Unsplash/pixabay

Coroico

Just two hour’s drive from La Paz, Coroico’s relaxed way of life feels worlds away from the big city. Spend a day or two just kicking back and enjoying the stupendous views or exploring nearby rivers and waterfalls. There’s also some fantastic trekking in the region, including the famous three-day El Choro hike.

Coroico |© Harry Stewart
Views from Coroico | © Harry Stewart

Sorata

Most travelers come to Sorata for its trekking, climbing and downhill mountain biking. But if you’re just looking to chill out for a bit, then Sorata’s the perfect place. This gorgeous little town enjoys a slow pace of life and impressive views of snowy mountains and lush forest valleys.

Treking with a Llama | © Goulevitch Jérémie/Flickr
Treking with a Llama | © Goulevitch Jérémie/Flickr

Lake Titicaca

As one of the most historically significant places in the Andes, a trip to Lake Titicaca is a must. Grab a delicious plate of fresh trout on Copacabana’s lake shore before jumping on a ferry to the sacred Isla del Sol (Sun Island). A three-hour hike across the island passes numerous Inca ruins and takes in some spectacular lakeside views. Locals believe the Sun and the Moon were born here and, for many visitors, it’s not hard to see why.

Titicaca Sunset | wrupcich/pixabay
Titicaca sunset | wrupcich/pixabay

Madidi National Park

This wondrous National Park is internationally renowned for its incredible diversity. Over 1,200 species of bird call Madidi home (14 per cent of the world’s known bird species) as well as countless other mammals, reptiles and insects. Jungle treks, eco-lodges and animal safaris create the perfect opportunity to observe nature at its rawest.

Titi Monkey | © PROSteve Wilson - over 8 million views Thanks !!/Flickr
Titi Monkey | © PROSteve Wilson - over 8 million views Thanks !!/Flickr

Salar de Uyuni

Bolivia’s number one tourist attraction never fails to amaze. Salar de Uyuni, the world’s largest and highest salt flat, is conveniently surrounded by a throng of other natural wonders, including colorful lagoons, towering volcanoes, bubbling hot springs and steamy geysers. An absolute must while traveling through Bolivia.

Salar de Uyuni | © Dimitry B./Flickr
Salar de Uyuni | © Dimitry B./Flickr

Toro Toro National Park

Toro Toro National Park has an impressive collection of well-preserved dinosaur footprints, some of which are mindbogglingly huge. If that doesn’t excite you, there’s also hikes through impressive canyons, bizarre animal-shaped rock formations and a fun caving experience.

Toro Toro | © travelmag.com/Flickr
Toro Toro | © travelmag.com/Flickr

Sajama National Park

If you really want to get away from it all, then Sajama is the place to go. This isolated National Park features a climbable dormant volcano, reflective lagoons, more llamas than you can poke a stick at, the world’s highest forest and some temperate hot springs to relax in after a long day exploring.

Sajama | © Embajada de Estados Unidos en Bolivia /Flickr
Sajama | © Embajada de Estados Unidos en Bolivia /Flickr

Amboro National Park

This nature lover’s paradise is just a short drive away from the metropolis of Santa Cruz. The park offers plenty of superb hiking trails which take in cascading waterfalls, scenic viewpoints and an incredible variety of flora and fauna.

Amboro National Park | © Ángel M. Felicísimo/Flickr
Amboro National Park | © Ángel M. Felicísimo/Flickr

Samaipata

This pleasant little town nestled in a lush valley is a favorite of retired expats and international tourists alike. It boasts a temperate climate, close proximity to Amboro National Park, an ancient pre-Colombian fortress and a fantastic waterfall and swimming hole.

Samaipata | © Madereugeneandrew/Wikipedia
Samaipata | © Madereugeneandrew/Wikipedia

Tiwanaku

As one of the most important pre-Colombian sites in the Americas, a visit to Tiwanaku is a must for any history buff. Set under the majestic Cordillera Real mountain range, Tiwinaku features an impressive number of beautifully crafted sculptures, gigantic stone building blocks and the mysterious, megalithic stone arch known as El Puerta del Sol (The Gate of the Sun). Take the time to peruse the onsite museum to learn more about this fascinating ancient culture.

Rurrenabaque

Rurrenabaque is a humid little jungle town on the edge of Madidi National Park. Scores of adventurers brave the arduous 18-hour bus ride (or opt for a 45-minute flight) from La Paz to visit this renowned Amazonian eco-tourism hub. A three-day pampas tour utilizes dugout canoes to provide a floating wildlife safari that is arguably the best in South America.

Turtles | © Maciej/Flickr
Turtles | © Maciej/Flickr