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© @cubanmuseum / Instagram
© @cubanmuseum / Instagram
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Everything You Need to Know About the American Museum of the Cuban Diaspora

Picture of Karina Castrillo
Updated: 23 April 2018
Perched on the edge of the thoroughfare of Miami’s Coral Way, the American Museum of the Cuban Diaspora is a reminder of the Cuban culture stitched into the city’s roots.

The museum, previously housed in Miami’s Cuban neighborhood of Little Havana, opened its new location in 2017, with the goal of providing a home for Cuban art in Miami.

The Cuban (for short), gives visitors a look at history, showcasing the cultural contribution and influence the Cuban Diaspora has had in the arts and humanities. Exhibits include paintings and sculptures by artists born exiled from Cuba.

The new building, clad in its Spanish Colonial style, boasts romanesque columns in the entryway. Costing $10 million and funded by Miami-Dade tax payers, it houses four exhibition galleries, spacious white hallways, and a 110-seat auditorium to showcase video.

The museum’s exhibition on display is titled “Dictators, Terrorism, War and Exiles” by Cuban-born artist Luis Cruz Azaceta, The 29 works cover various topics including exile experiences, dictatorship abuse, as well works depicting terrorism in several countries. Azaceta works primarily on large canvases, with highly expressive colors and themes of urban violence. While living in his former home in Cuba, he observed the violence of the communist dictatorship, which he prominently showcases in his works. Many of his paintings are exhibited in the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Smithsonian American Art Museum, among others.

Though expected to draw many crowds, the American Museum of the Cuban Diaspora remains closed throughout much of the week. The doors are only open to the public on weekends from 10 a.m. – 4 p.m.