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The 10 Best Restaurants In Esfahan, Iran
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The 10 Best Restaurants In Esfahan, Iran

Picture of Shaahin Pishbin
Updated: 9 February 2017
There are few places in Iran (and the world) that can top the magnificence of Esfahan’s Islamic architecture. With an abundance of bridges, mosques, and palaces that date back centuries, Esfahan is, unsurprisingly, one of Iran’s top tourist destinations. Here are 10 great places to eat during your stay.

Sofrekhaneh Sonnati

Translated as “traditional eating house,” Sofrekhaneh Sonnati is located just along the east side of Imam Square. Thankfully, its popularity with tourists doesn’t diminish the quality of food or the ambiance. The colourfully tiled walls, arches, and stained glass windows create a wonderful atmosphere. Enjoy traditional Iranian cuisine here while sitting on authentic takhts (carpeted and cushioned eating platforms).

East side of Imam Square, Esfahan, Iran, +98 31 32200729

Sadaf Hotel Restaurant

Situated on Hafez Street, the Sadaf Hotel is less than a five-minute walk away from Imam Square and offers traditional Iranian dishes. What makes this place stand out is the rooftop restaurant which is open during the summer months. Guests that manage to get a table are rewarded with unparalleled views of Esfahan’s unforgettable cityscape.

220 Hafez Street, Esfahan, Iran, +98 220 2988

Imam Khomeini Mosque | © © sier-seir/Flickr
Imam Khomeini Mosque | © © sier-seir/Flickr
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Shahrzad Restaurant

Shahrzad Restaurant is popular for being one of the few dining places in town that pulls off the Qajar aesthetic to a high standard. With stained-glass windows and intricate mirror work, the restaurant is tastefully furnished, light and airy. Reliably busy and perhaps a little noisy, Shahrzad has a lively atmosphere and an agreeable selection of traditional Iranian dishes; try the delicious joojeh kebab. It’s also good for vegetarian options, something that isn’t always a given in Iranian restaurants.

Abbas Abad Street, Esfahan, Iran, +98 31 3220 4490

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Khangostar Restaurant

Khangostar is a restaurant on the ground floor of the Jolfa Hotel in Jolfa – Esfahan’s Armenian district. Its décor is unpretentious and the restaurant is clean, efficient, and most importantly, serves generous portions of excellent Iranian food. The chelo kebab is a highlight. It has the laid back dynamic of a cafeteria, with a self-service salad bar which is great for vegetarians.

Hakim Nezami Street, Jolfa Hotel, Jolfa, Esfahan, Iran, +98 311 627 8989

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Khayyam Restaurant

Khayyam Restaurant (Restoran-e Khayyam) in Jolfa is a cheap and cheerful kebabi which is popular with the locals, Try a juicy joojeh or koobideh and wash down with a non-alcoholic beer. The traditional Iranian teas on offer are also worth trying.

Nazar Street, Jolfa, Esfahan, Iran

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Cheshm-Andaz

The Abbasi Hotel occupies the remains of a 17th-century caravanserai, and if the rooms are out of your price range, it’s worth visiting one of the several restaurants based in the hotel. The rooftop restaurant Cheshm-Andaz is particularly enjoyable for its views of Imam Square and the mountains that surround the city. It has options to dine inside and outside and a menu with a good selection of both Iranian and Western meals.

Amadegah Street, Esfahan, Ira, +98 31 3222 6010

The Abbasi Hotel | © Unknown/Wikicommons
The Abbasi Hotel | © Unknown/Wikicommons

Azam Beryani

Beryani is an Esfahani delicacy made from mutton or lamb which has been minced, skewered, and grilled over an open fire. Usually served with freshly made nan-e taftoon, a delicious Iranian flat bread, it’s worth experiencing before you leave Esfahan. Wash it all down with a glass of Dugh, a refreshing yoghurt drink with dried mint. The restaurateurs at Azam Beryani specialise in this dish, and they have two branches; one by the river, and one further north.

Masjed Seyyed Street and Kamal Esmaeel Street, Esfahan, Iran

Esfahani Beryani | © © پوویا/Wikicommons
Esfahani Beryani | © © پوویا/Wikicommons
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Kaleh Pacheh

If you pride yourself on your strong stomach and adventurous palette, Kaleh Pacheh may be the ideal culinary tale from Iran to impress your friends back home with. Essentially, it’s boiled sheep head, brains, tongue, eyeballs and all. Sheep hooves are also often included. The testimonies of many Iranians will try to convince you of its tastiness, but there is only one way to find out. Various food stalls around the bazaar sell Kaleh Pacheh, and its best eaten first thing in the morning (apparently).

Around the bazaar, Esfahan, Iran

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Fereni Hafez

Fereni Hafez are the masters of Esfahani speciality fereni, a mixture of rice flour, milk, sugar, rosewater, and sometimes dates, served in a bowl and popular for breakfast. It’s sweet, cheap, and perfect for vegetarians, although its not a big dish and you might need a couple of bowls to keep you going until your next meal.

Hafez Street, Esfahan, Iran

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Picnicking in Imam Square

Esfahanis flock to Imam Square most evenings to enjoy the cool weather and lively night-time atmosphere. Many bring food along for picnics, or buy street food around the square. If you have any food left over from the massive portion at lunchtime, or simply want to pick up a corn on the cob from a street vendor, picnicking in the square during the evening is great way to see another side of the city and its people.

Price: Budget

Watch out for: The lively atmosphere

Address: Imam Square (also known as Naqsh-e Jahan Square), Esfahan, Iran

Picnicking in Imam Square | © Adam Jones/Wikicommons
Picnicking in Imam Square | © Adam Jones/Wikicommons