airport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar
Explore your world
Cancel

Beautiful Towns To Explore In The Cotswolds

Picture of Nina Brown
Nina Brown
Updated: 9 February 2017
The Cotswolds covers 800 square miles of rolling ‘wolds’, or hills, and crosses five different English counties. These hills are home to some of the most beautiful and historic towns in the country. We check out the places you just have to discover here.

Cirencester

The unofficial ‘capital of the Cotswolds’, Cirencester boasts about its Roman past in the wonderful Corinium Museum. Use the handy museum app to take you on a tour around the town, taking in the market square, St John the Baptist Church, and the vast Abbey Grounds. You might also want to visit the New Brewery Arts Centre to gain insight into the town’s vibrant arts and crafts movement.

 

Oxford

Dominated by one of the oldest and most prestigious universities in the world, Oxford is one of the most beautiful cities in England. Wander around the city streets, hopping from college to college and stopping in to sample some artisan food in the Covered Market. Make sure you visit Christ Church Cathedral and then roam around Christ Church meadows, taking in the river Thames, Merton and Corpus Christi Colleges and the Botanical Gardens that all cluster around these open fields.

 

Bath

Now a UNESCO World Heritage site, Bath’s Roman Baths, Abbey, Theatre Royal and Pulteney Bridge are just a few of the stunning features that make this thriving city a must for any traveler to the Cotswolds. The Georgian architecture, epitomized in the Circle quarter, conjures up images of 18th century aristocratic life and has served as the backdrop to period films such as The Duchess and Vanity Fair.

 

Chipping Camden

A small town, Chipping Camden makes up for what it lacks in size by reveling in medieval splendor. Hire a bike to rove between The Woolstapler’s Hall, the High Street, Almshouses, and St James’ Church. Take a break with a traditional English tea in one of the many delightful teahouses and then head off due south east and back even further in time to the Rollright Stones.

 

Stow on the Wold

Once the centre of the English wool trade Stow remains one of the most famous market towns in the Cotswolds. Visit the market square with its 15th Century Market Cross, the 12th century St Edward’s Church, walk the narrow alleys spanning out from the market square that were used to funnel animals around the town and have a drink at The Porch House, reputed to be the oldest inn in England.