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Maser street art in Dublin | © William Murphy/Flickr
Maser street art in Dublin | © William Murphy/Flickr
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The Far-Reaching Work Of Irish Street Artist Maser

Picture of Kate Phelan
Updated: 13 September 2016
Talented Irish graffiti artist Maser began creating street art around Dublin city in 1995, quickly developing a cult following. Since then he has worked on multiple high profile projects across Europe and the US, where he is now based. Earlier this year he staged his first solo show at London’s Lazarides gallery, exhibiting new works on canvas and wood. No matter where they are located, Maser’s generally abstract designs are intended to engage and provoke thought, often having a strong message. His recent Dublin commission to create a mural in support of repealing the 8th amendment of the Irish constitution has gone on to become the official emblem of the country’s campaign for increased abortion rights. Read on to discover some of the artist’s best works.

They Are Us Project, Dublin, Ireland

A collaboration with Irish musician Damien Dempsey on the They Are Us project in 2010, they filled run down alleyways and unexpected spots throughout Dublin with inspiring graffiti. The initiative raised funds for the homeless, and saw Maser run spray-painting classes for offenders at Dublin’s Mountjoy prison.

U Are Alive Mural, Dublin, Ireland

The artist updated his U Are Alive mural on Camden Street with rainbow colours in support of the vote to legalise same-sex marriage in Ireland in 2015.

Mural Honouring Darby’s Rangers, Arkansas, USA

At the 2015 Unexpected festival in Fort Smith, Arkansas, Maser completed a mural in memory of William Darby, a US army officer who was sent to Northern Ireland at the beginning of World War II and created the elite military unit known as Darby’s Rangers. Darby was killed in action in Italy in 1945, two days before German forces surrendered there.

The Dancing of Light, Munich, Germany

This installation at Mixed Munich Arts nightclub was intended to convey the idea that ‘light is hope.’

Setting up for the show tonight in Munich #maserart

A photo posted by M A S E R (@maserart) on

Bram Stoker Festival, Dublin, Ireland

This temporary interactive exhibition space was created in Smithfield, Dublin as part of the Bram Stoker Festival in 2015.

Web Summit Stage, Dublin, Ireland

Maser created a colourful stage for the 2015 Web Summit in Dublin.

Stage designed for @websummit #maserart #websummit2015

A photo posted by M A S E R (@maserart) on

My Relationship With Colour, Dublin, Ireland

This piece was created and auctioned for the Jack & Jill Foundation, an Irish charity dedicated to helping young children with brain damage and intellectual and physical developmental problems.

Higher Ground, Sydney, Australia

His two-story Higher Ground project at Sydney Festival 2015 focused on ‘converging architecture and geometry on a grand scale.’

#maserart @sydney_festival

A photo posted by M A S E R (@maserart) on

The Maser Bus, Part of Irish Design 2015

As part of the year of Irish Design (ID2015), this unique bus wrap was created by Maser for Expressway intercity buses in Ireland.

Liberia, Africa

Earlier this year he helped transform a basketball court in Libera as part of Apartial‘s Liberia Project.

Locals help me create an installation in Liberia @apartial #maserart

A photo posted by M A S E R (@maserart) on

Champ Libre, Montreal, Canada

Maser has made several murals in Montreal in 2016, as part of a project called Champ Libre in collaboration with LNDMRK production company.

Nearly finished in Montreal @lndmrk ❤️ #maserart

A photo posted by M A S E R (@maserart) on

Repeal the 8th, Dublin

Last but not least, his popular Repeal the 8th mural at the Project Arts Centre in Temple Bar – which was controversially removed on the orders of the Dublin City Council – just got Maser the coveted cover of the autumn 2016 edition of the quarterly Irish Arts Review.