Explore your world
Totality | © OpenClipart-Vectors / pixabay
Totality | © OpenClipart-Vectors / pixabay

The Best Places to Watch a Total Solar Eclipse in the Next Decade

Picture of Harry Stewart
Updated: 20 September 2017

Missed the epic eclipse in North America last month? Don’t worry, because despite what you may have been led to believe, a total solar eclipse is actually a relatively common global event. Yet every eclipse is unique, meaning the path of totality (where the moon fully blocks out the sun) hits a different location each event. Here are the best places to experience this awe-inspiring celestial phenomenon over the next ten years.

July 2, 2019

North America got a spectacular astronomical show last August and in 2019 it’ll be South America’s turn to turn out the lights. This highly anticipated eclipse will cruise through the Pacific before blocking out the sun in La Serena, Chile and moving onto San Juan and Junin in Argentina. Eventually, it will disappear into the Atlantic just south of Buenos Aires.

The Elqui Valley will be the best spot to witness this extraordinary extraterrestrial display, largely because the region is awash with observatories thanks to its reputation for bright, sunny days.

Dec 14, 2020

South America is in for another treat as a second total solar eclipse plunges parts of Argentina and Chile into darkness just a year and a half later. This time, the path of totality will sail the South Pacific before crossing over the Chilean city of Temuco and across the Andes, missing most sizable Argentine urban areas aside from the small town of Valcheta.

December is summer in Chile, making Temuco the ideal place to catch a glimpse before heading off to hike the majestic wildness of Patagonia.

Dec 4, 2021

Unless you happen to be a penguin, you’re probably going to miss this one. 2021’s eclipse will only see totality reach the Southern Ocean, Antarctica, and the Southern Atlantic.

Nevertheless, die-hard eclipse chasers will be able to book an Antarctica cruise to coincide with event. For a premium, of course.

Total solar eclipse | © opapaty / Flickr

April 20, 2023

2023 is Oceania’s turn, with totality clipping the very western edge of Australia before enveloping almost half of Timor-Leste and arriving in West Papua, Indonesia.

Timor-Leste is our pick. Cheap, awesome beaches and well off the beaten track.

April 8, 2024

This is the next big one as far as North America is concerned. After slicing through Mexico, it’ll cross over a number of highly populated urban centers in the USA such as San Antonio, Dallas, Indianapolis, Cleveland and Buffalo. In Canada, Montreal plus a large portion of Newfoundland will also be plunged into darkness.

We recommend a trip to Mazatlán in Mexico – a fun coastal city with almost guaranteed sunshine and festivity.

Sunset Beach Eclipse May 20th 2012 | © jimnista / Flickr

Aug 12, 2026

Europe is due for a stellar display in 2026, when totality will first cross over Greenland before hitting up Reykjavik, the capital of Iceland. After making its way across the Atlantic Ocean, the moon’s shadow will cover the Spanish tourist hot spots of Bilbao, Valencia and Palma.

Our pick is Palma, as the ever sunny Balearic island of Majorca is bound to celebrate the event in style.

Aug 2, 2027

In 2027, the Middle East and North Africa will have their chance to witness an incredible astronomical event. This time, a massive path of totality will pass over Morocco, Spain, Tunisia, Algeria, Libya, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Yemen and Somalia.

Although there are many possibilities to choose from, we think Málaga in Spain will be the best choice for its well developed tourism infrastructure.

Fun fact:

Eclipse chasers are die-hard fanatics who travel the world to experience totality in as many solar eclipses as possible. Some believe a true eclipse chaser must have lived at least an hour under the moon’s shadow, an epic feat that requires an average of 20 eclipses. Are you up for the challenge?