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By Bambi Corro | Unsplash
By Bambi Corro | Unsplash
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Long Haul Flights Are About to Get a Wellness Upgrade

Picture of Esme Benjamin
Wellness Editor
Updated: 27 June 2017
It’s unfortunate that incredible trips must begin and end with a long, uncomfortable plane journey. But the days of inadequate sleep, freezing cold recycled air and over-salted meals may soon be over, as Qantas has vowed to implement a better approach to in-flight wellbeing on its new Boeing 787 Dreamliner planes, launching later this year.

The airline has partnered with The University of Sydney’s Charles Perkins Centre to research strategies for healthier long distance travel. Experts in diet, sleep and physical activity are joining forces to formalize strategies aimed at reducing jet lag, encouraging movement, and enhancing rest while aboard the Dreamliner.

Among other things they’ll be testing options for cabin temperature and lighting, transit lounge wellness services, recipes, and optimal service times—because what’s more annoying than having your nap disturbed by a disingenuously cheerful flight attendant serving an underwhelming meal.

By Ethan Sykes
By Ethan Sykes | Unsplash

According to industry site CPP Luxury, it’s the first time a collaboration of this type has examined in-flight health beyond medical emergencies. “There is the potential for extraordinary health, science and engineering discoveries and innovations to come out of this research partnership, which will also provide the evidence-base needed for Qantas to implement strategies to further improve how people feel after a long haul flight,” Professor Steve Simpson of the Charles Perkins Center told the publication.

These new and improved wellness-focused flights could be a real game-changer, and set the precedent for improvements across the airline industry.