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Where to Get Dreamy Bespoke Textiles in Brooklyn

Picture of Amber C. Snider
Home & Design Editor
Updated: 12 December 2017
Cope introduces a soothing collection of natural, hand-dyed fabrics to Brooklyn, reminding us that sometimes a few new soft goods are all you need for the hard times.

There’s nothing like new textiles for a new year. Husband and wife team Rachel and Nick Cope, who founded Calico Wallpaper in Brooklyn in 2013, specialize in marbling and dip-dying techniques for bespoke paper creations. In November 2017, the creative duo launched a sister company, Cope. Bringing the same attention to detail and traditional techniques to textiles and soft goods, the Copes use “nature, science, and the arts” as backdrops for their creative expressions.

FloraWildflower 1 (credit Cope)
Flora Wildflower | Courtesy of Cope © Adam Ryder

Their bespoke wallpapers have already been featured in some of the world’s greatest design shows, including the London Design Festival and Salone del Mobile in Milan. They’re currently bringing a whimsical flair to soft urban design that feels distinctly serene, and inspirational—and it’s all happening in Brooklyn.

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Calico Wallpaper founders Rachel and Nick Cope | © Cope

The Copes’ existing gradient wallpaper design Aurora was adapted as a fabric pattern to “immerse viewers in waves and washes of gradient color,” drawing heavily from shibori and ombré techniques; it was inspired by the phenomena of light. Shibori is an ancient Japanese dyeing technique, while ombré produces a gradual shaded look (it’s not just a hair trend). Their process for constructing the Aurora pattern includes suspending mineral pigments in liquid and transferring them to organic linen. The result is a fluid, luscious design that is reminiscent of the natural elements.

According to the designer’s site, each Aurora pattern is “a study in the relationship between light, color, place and mood.” The entire Cope collection, which debuted earlier last month, features four designs printed on Belgian linen: Sumi, Palette, Aurora, and Flora. In an age where most home goods are mass-produced and homogenized, this resurfacing of hand-crafted textiles (in New York City at that) comes as a welcome aesthetic relief.

AuroraRay (credit Cope)
AuroraRay | Courtesy of Cope © Adam Ryder

“When designing the collection, I thought a lot about our weekend home in Hudson, New York, which we are currently renovating,” Rachel told Architectural Digest last month. “It’s a serene place where we love to spend time with our family, and there are also glimmers of my childhood when I would spend time in my mother’s studio.”

Breezy, upstate New York-inspired designs seem like a perfect fit for curtains, especially as the natural hues billow against the window. And although you can’t have a tranquil mountain view outside your Brooklyn window, indulging in this elegant fabric collection seems like a good way to play pretend.

Various
Various textiles | © Cope