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Celebrate Gay Pride in Mexico City
Celebrate Gay Pride in Mexico City | © Esparta Palma/ Flickr
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The Best Things to See and Do in Mexico City in Summer

Picture of Lauren Cocking
Northern England Writer
Updated: 2 May 2018
Summer in Mexico City has its drawbacks. After all, it rains almost constantly of an afternoon, plus the jacarandas have retreated for another year so there’s no longer that spring feel in the air. All that aside though, there are still plenty of worthwhile things to enjoy during a Mexico City summer.

Escape the rain at a museum

First of all, you can escape that aforementioned rain by heading to one of the capital’s top museums. There’s no excuse not to after all, because there are more than a hundred, of which plenty offer year-round free access (like the Museo del Estanquillo or the Soumaya art gallery) or at least free entry one day a week (head to Museo Dolores Olmedo on Tuesdays, Museo del Palacio de Bellas Artes on Sundays and Museo Universitario del Chopo on Wednesdays). Just be aware that most Mexico City museums are closed on Mondays.

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Museo Soumaya is free 365 days a year | © vladimix/ Flickr

Escape the rain at a restaurant

Alternatively, avoid getting drenched by instead making dinner reservations at one of Mexico City’s top restaurants. Summer is nowhere near peak season for the capital, so you might just have a shot at getting into one of Mexico City’s top dining options, like Pujol, Nicos or Quintonil, all of which were featured in Latin America’s Top 50 in 2017.

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Make reservations at Pujol | © Nan Palmero/ Flickr

Summer school art boot camp with SOMA

If you’re an international art curator, critic or historian (or even just a plain ol’ artist) then consider enrolling in the annual SOMA summer school art programme. Over the course of eight-weeks you’ll be able to attend talks and workshops with prominent names on the Mexican art scene, as well as get guided gallery and studio tours. As you might imagine, getting a place can prove tough and you do have to provide a ton of info in your application, but it’s well worth it!

Tuck into chiles en nogada

Chiles en nogada might be most strongly associated with Mexican Independence Day in mid-September, but the official season for them kicks off in late July/ August. So, make the most of this seasonal availability if you find yourself in Mexico City over summer and tuck into this highly traditional, regional dish. It consists of a roasted chili, stuffed with ground meat and dried fruits, topped with a creamy walnut sauce and pomegranate seeds.

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Chiles en nogada should be tried in summer | © Daniel Dionne/Flickr

March at the Gay Pride parade

Some people are surprised to learn that Mexico City, the capital of a still overwhelmingly conservative, Catholic country, hosts an annual Gay Pride Parade, but it does! In fact, each summer (usually in late June) the streets of Mexico City, swell with Pride, as members of the queer community march from the Ángel de la Independencia towards the zocalo.

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Celebrate Gay Pride in Mexico City | © Esparta Palma/ Flickr

Celebrate Nuestra Señora del Carmen

On July 16th each year, Mexico celebrates Nuestra Señora del Carmen and one of the best places to see the festivities just happens to be in San Ángel, Mexico City. The tranquil southern neighbourhood truly comes into bloom, as the streets are taken over by a procession full of people laden with bunches of flowers making their way towards the Ex Convento de Nuestra Señora del Carmen. This specific event also coincides with La Feria de los Flores de San Ángel, which is celebrated for two weeks in mid-July.

Ride your bike down Reforma

Mexico City might welcome the rainy season in summer, but the storm clouds typically close in during the late afternoon, which means you can still take part in the early morning bike ride down Reforma. Each Sunday (minus the last one of every month), the entire avenue is closed off, giving free reign to avid and amateur rollerbladers, joggers and cyclists alike.

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Ride your bike down Reforma | © Brett Hodnett/ Flickr