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Argentina fashions are going international as shown by this runway in Dallas | ©Fitz Crittle / Flickr
Argentina fashions are going international as shown by this runway in Dallas | ©Fitz Crittle / Flickr
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8 Fashion Designers You Need to Know in Argentina

Picture of Jerry Nelson
Updated: 10 February 2017
Argentina has not been known for its fashion designers. Tango? Yes. Beef? Yes. Soccer, aka ‘futbol’? Yes. Fashion design? Ah, no. However, thanks to a growing stable of world-renowned designers, Argentina is putting its mark on the runways of Europe. Argentine designers are often on a first-name basis with their assistants, and the couture dresses are created for a reasonable price in addition to beauty and excitement. The fashion world has increasingly turned its attention to emerging economies – and Argentina is primed for continued growth, recognition and global success.
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Pablo Ramirez

Fashion used to dictate that the quantity of buttons on a sleeve indicated the importance of the wearer. Some tops by Ramirez have six. He is currently recognized as fashion’s foundation in Argentina as his work is simplistic and attractive. Ramirez sustains a strong reputation overseas. People wanting to impress can feel comfortable as Ramirez’s styles show confidence sitting among more well-known European labels. Ramirez shows regularly in Europe and will begin showing on the established circuit. Located in San Telmo, Ramirez’s shop has served celebrities taking advantage of the style when attending MTV Awards.

Pablo Ramierez's designs show up often on MTV | © Lali Esposito / Flickr

Pablo Ramierez’s designs show up often on MTV | © Lali Esposito/Flickr

Jessica Trosman

While Trosman was a kid, she wrote on partitions and trimmed fabric. Her clothes reflect that and are a mix of materials and forms. From classic and cozy woolen jumpers to a sinuous jersey maxi dress with fleece and skin, her products interest and work well. Besides the expected shirts with silky paneling, the remainder of the pieces are engaging and novel. Home for Trosman’s store is Patio Bullrich mall in Recoleta.

Martin Churba

While Argentina strengthens its links with Japan, Martin Churba is the connection. Modern mixed with futuristic designs catch the viewer’s eye and make many want to view more. The jib of his slacks has been described as ‘edgy and synchronous’. Churba’s background began almost two decades ago. His training describes the colorful variety of its designs as the decoration and texture make his clothes stand out. Begun in 2002, his label ‘Tramando’ has been declared a new, compelling improvement in Argentina and is changing Argentines’ approach to fashion.

Min Agostini

A different growing presence on Argentina’s runways is Agostini, an honored regular at BAF. Recently her praises from overseas have been generous. Harrods in London displayed her production in the central window to show off Argentine fashion as named in the UK as the most notable Argentine artist. Made from a single section of braided and crimped material, Agostini creates stand-out clothing. This year’s collection shows rich colors of sky-blue and red dancing with shades of black.

Harrods put Min Agostini front and center in the store window | © Colin McLurg / Flickr
Harrods put Min Agostini front and center in the store window | © Colin McLurg / Flickr

Benito Fernandez

Fernandez’s clothes photograph nicely. Looking at his campaigns and catwalks reveal the creativity and color-inventiveness in his pieces. Beginning in 1994, when Fernandez started selling clothes, he remained primarily in the latest works. Trained in the law, Benito transferred to Flego, Argentina’s institute of style, before moving on to the Paris-American Academy. With shows during New York’s fashion week, his international reputation continues to translate into global success. On first glance, his boutique is a gaudy array of colors, sequins, and feathers. The singular nature of color blends and slices reveal individual quality.

Chain García

Fashion is about telling a story. Not many tell the story better than Juliana Chain and Lucia García Bello. ‘Our work is autobiographical and conceptual,’ says 26-year old Chain. ‘We work with all natural fibers which don’t damage the Earth.’ The University of Buenos Aires grads first hit fashion’s radar when they attained the finals of Fashion Edition BA in March 2016. Their collection tells the story of nostalgia for a family home as they took biodegradable, household materials and crafted them into tunic-style dresses, tops, and shirts.

Chain Carcia's fashions are eco-friendly | © Rebecca / Flickr
Chain García’s fashions are eco-friendly | © Rebecca / Flickr

Transeunte

Also fusing a conceptual approach with fashion is Córdoba-based Transeunte. The brand first debuted in 2016 with a collection inspired by the urban landmarks in Córdoba. Transeunte’s designer, Lula Rojas, says, ‘My inspiration for each collection is linked to the moment in my surroundings.’ Transeunte’s collection shows off slick tailored pants, blazers, jackets, dresses and overalls in a selection of solid colors which vary with the season. The brand sells its collection from its headquarters, Studio & Shop, in Córdoba, and plans to begin selling online soon.

Ian Van Lierde

Van Lierde became inspired to launch his brand while working as a designer for five years at Etiqueta Negra and Gola. ‘I realized there was a niche for simple, modern lifestyle products for men,’ Van Lierde said. Relying on his knowledge and contacts, Van Lierde came out with all-black accessories like belts, wallets and weekend bags. ‘Black is a symbol of masculinity and sophistication,’ says Van Lierde.

Argentina fashions are going international as shown by this runway in Dallas | ©Fitz Crittle / Flickr
Argentina fashions are going international as shown by this runway in Dallas | ©Fitz Crittle / Flickr