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Alejandro Sordi's "La Fuente" (The Source), acrylic and oil on canvas |Courtesy of Alejandro Sordi
Alejandro Sordi's "La Fuente" (The Source), acrylic and oil on canvas |Courtesy of Alejandro Sordi

6 Artists From Argentina Who Should Be on Your Radar

Picture of Kristin Deasy
Contributor
Updated: 9 May 2017

Buenos Aires’ cultural life is phenomenal, and its artists are a big reason why. The city draws them like a magnet. The amount of cultural activities going on at one time in the Argentine capital is impressive, be it dance, theater, workshops, free government-funded cultural enrichment programs, or exhibitions on at one of the city’s many art galleries. It’s worth familiarizing yourself with the following Argentine artists—they’re going places.

Diego Gravinese’s “Nymph,” acrylic and oil, 2016 |Courtesy of Diego Gravinese

Diego Gravinese

Born in the city of La Plata, the hyperrealist painter Diego Gravinese is an extremely popular Argentine artist. Now based in Buenos Aires, you can follow him on Facebook here.

Argentine composer Kaleema |Courtesy of Kaleema

Kaleema

Kaleema is a young Argentine female composer and DJ who folds folklore and indigenous South American music into her work. Asked to describe her work to Culture Trip, Kaleema said (translated from Spanish):

“I believe it is a way to integrate the love I have for folklore music from all over the world with my own musical calling. What I really love is listening to music with roots, for example a choir of Bulgarian women that produces a sound so potent, with so much heart, you feel it in your core—it really touches my soul. Popular music and folklore tradition is part of daily life in communities, it grows out collective experience and isn’t intellectual—people are always coming together through music to share stories, celebrate, express their pain and sadness, loves and lost loves; this is my greatest inspiration.”

Currently producing her first solo album, you can listen here, or watch this music video:

Nicolas Romero Escalada

A street artist and painter, 31-year-old creative Nicolas Romero was born in Buenos Aires and now works both in Argentina and abroad. Keep tabs on him on Facebook here, or go see one this piece in Buenos Aires’ Villa Crespo neighborhood (Padilla 925):

Nicolas Romero Escalada’s “Description of the Arrival of an Ideology,” mural, Villa Crespo, Buenos Aires |Courtesy of Nicolas Romero Escalada

Andrés Aizicovich

Up-and-coming artist Andrés Aizicovich is hard to categorize. He paints. He works with furniture and objects. He creates spaces and feelings. His works have been exhibited by Buenos Aires’ influential Centro Cultural Recoleta. In a Spanish statement shared with Culture Trip, the 32-year-old artist explained:

I’m interested in investigating the crosses and borders between cultural heritage, identity, the persistence of memory and the uses of the city as a sensitive container of the experiences of its inhabitants.”

Here’s his most recent work (that’s Aizicovich on the bike):

Andrés Aizicovich’s “Relación de dependencia” (Codependent Relationship), 2017 |Courtesy of Andrés Aizicovich

Agustin Romero

Young novelist, actor, and playwright Agustin Romero is currently at work on his second novel after writing and producing an experimental play that went on tour in the country’s south last year.

Augustin Romero |Courtesy of Augustin Romero

The 33-year-old artist from Chubut province had great success with his first book, El Paraíso de Los Solos (Paradise of Loners), which is available throughout Buenos Aires (the book is in Spanish only at the moment). Currently part of an alternative dance production called “The Manifesto” in Buenos Aires, keep an eye on Romero—his work has him at the heart of Argentina’s vibrant nexus of art, theater, and literature.

Alejandro Sordi

Alejandro Sordi is a 32-year-old artist from Buenos Aires who works in various mediums. He produces objects, paintings, digital art, and even street art. Ancient symbols and patterns from South American cultures feature strongly in his work, yet the delivery is distinctly modern. Follow him on Facebook here. One of his works:

Alejandro Sordi’s “La Fuente” (The Source), acrylic and oil on canvas |Courtesy of Alejandro Sordi