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Lavena Coastal Walk, Taveuni, Fiji | © Björn Groß / Flickr
Lavena Coastal Walk, Taveuni, Fiji | © Björn Groß / Flickr

The Most Scenic Hiking Routes in Fiji

Picture of Juliette Sivertsen
Updated: 21 February 2017

While most people associate Fiji with long sandy beaches and ultimate relaxation, it’s also home to some incredible hiking routes. Get high up for a beautiful view of the islands, or go further inland into the rainforests for your own jungle adventures.

Mount Tomanivi

Mount Tomanivi, originally known as Mount Victoria, is Fiji’s highest mountain, standing tall at 1232 meters (4341 feet). The mountain pierces Viti Levu‘s skyline, putting Fiji’s volcanic landscape right on show. It is on average a six-hour climb to the summit and, on a clear day, you can see out to the Yasawa Island group from the top.

It’s classified as a difficult hike due to the steep terrain toward the peak. You can hire a guide from Navai village to take you to the top. The best time to climb is during the drier, cooler months of June to August, as the track can get very wet in the middle of Fiji’s summer.

Mount Batilamu

Mount Batilamu, also referred to as the Sleeping Giant, is part of the Koroyanitu National Heritage Park, near Lautoka in Viti Levu. From Nase Lodge to the top of Mount Batilamu typically takes around five hours (return), but there are also shorter hikes on offer through the park. Expect to wind through forests, waterfalls and secluded swimming holes. The mountain stands at 1110 meters and offers panoramic views to the Mamanuca and Yasawa Island groups. For a true cultural experience, you can stay with a family in Abaca village. The Abaca Visitor Center can organize trips, accommodation and meals for your hiking party.

Sigatoka Sand Dunes

The Sigatoka Sand Dunes are considered to be Fiji’s first national park and it is an important archaeological site. It is at this location where excavations uncovered potsherds from the early Lapita people, as well as human remains. Many of the items uncovered in this area are now kept at the Fiji Museum in Suva. The dune system spans over 600 hectares, some up to 60 meters tall.

You can choose either one-hour or two-hour hikes through the dunes, but it’s best to do this first thing in the morning to avoid hiking in the heat of the day next to the black sand.

Sigatoka Sand Dunes | © Kyle Post / Flickr

Sigatoka Sand Dunes | © Kyle Post / Flickr

Tavoro Falls

The Bouma National Heritage Park on Fiji’s third largest island of Taveuni not only provides a beautiful jungle hike, it also guides you to some of the most stunning waterfalls in the nation – the Tavoro Falls, also known as the Bouma Falls. It’s about a three-hour hike in total. The first waterfall drops 24 meters and is only about 10 minutes into the journey. The hike gets a little more difficult after this, but the views are worth it when you can look out to Matangi, Laucala and Qamea Islands.  The second and third waterfalls are smaller in size but much more secluded and peaceful.

Bouma Falls, Taveuni, Fiji | © Joe Belanger / Shutterstock

Bouma Falls, Taveuni, Fiji | © Joe Belanger / Shutterstock

Lavena Coastal Walk

The Lavena Coastal Walk is actually part of the Bouma National Heritage Park in Taveuni, but this hike shows off the island’s stunning coast instead. There are quite a few spots along the way to stop, rest or swim, such as Unuca Point, which is an ideal way to conclude the day’s hike. You’ll go from white sand beaches to black sand beaches and come across beautiful rainforests snuggled into the tropical surroundings. Give yourself at least half a day for this reasonably flat and straightforward expedition.

Lavena Coastal Walk, Taveuni, Fiji | © Björn Groß / Flickr

Lavena Coastal Walk, Taveuni, Fiji | © Björn Groß / Flickr