Walking and Hiking in Jervis Bay, Australia

The Scribbly Gum Track lies within the Jervis Bay National Park
The Scribbly Gum Track lies within the Jervis Bay National Park | © martin berry / Alamy Stock Photo
Photo of Sarah Reid
10 July 2020

With two national parks to explore along with the vast Beecroft Peninsula, there are enough walking and hiking trails in the Jervis Bay area to keep enthusiasts on their feet for weeks. From seaside strolls to more challenging bushwalks, here are six of the best walks and hikes to tackle, all of which include an opportunity for a swim along the way.

When hiking in any of Australia’s national parks, remember to leave no trace, take no souvenirs and always stay on the track. Bring plenty of water and sun protection, and be sure to let someone know where you’re going, especially if you’re heading out alone.

Munyunga Waraga Dhugan Walking Trail

Natural Feature
Map View
Cape St George Lighthouse Ruin 1860 Jervis Bay Territory Australia
© David Wall / Alamy Stock Photo

An ideal introduction to Booderee National Park, this 5.4km (3.4mi) loop (also known as Murrays Trail) is a self-guided tour of the park’s plants, animals, culture and history – there are 14 informative signs placed along the route. Beginning at Murrays Beach car park, the trail takes around 2.5hr, with the possibility to extend it to check out the ruins of Cape St George Lighthouse, built in 1860 and abandoned in the early 20th century.

White Sands Walk and Scribbly Gum Track

Hiking Trail
Map View
Scribbly Gum Tree along a sand path on Fraser Island, Queensland
© Fotoaray / Alamy Stock Photo

Starting at Greenfield Beach picnic area, these interconnected walking tracks loop through beautiful Jervis Bay National Park. The White Sands Walk heads south along Jervis Bay, passing Chinamans Beach. The return leg along the Scribbly Gum Track leads you away from the coast, through a lush wooded area, and finishes up where you started. Along the walk, you may see animals such as possums and gliders.

The Wreck Walk

Hiking Trail
Map View
Remains of the steamship SS Merimbula which ran aground at Whale Point in 1928, Currarong, Beecroft Peninsula, Jervis Bay, New South Wales, NSW, Austr
© Genevieve Vallee / Alamy Stock Photo

Encompassing the Beecroft Headland east of Currarong, Abraham’s Bosom Reserve is laced with excellent walking trails of various lengths. Looping around the headland, Coomies Walk (9km/6mi) is the main circuit, but one of the most popular detours is the Wreck Walk, a 2.5km (1.6mi) walk to the wreck of the SS Merimbula, which ran aground near Whale Point in 1928. Both trails begin at Abraham’s Bosom Beach.

Round the Bay Walk

Natural Feature
Map View
Callala Beach near Jarvis Bay, Sydney, Australia
© Simon Anders / Alamy Stock Photo

Arguably Jervis Bay’s most accessible walking trail, Round the Bay Walk is a fully paved walking track from Callala Bay to Plantation Point in Vincentia, 11km (7mi) to the south, including a short ferry trip across Currambene Creek. Perfect for prams, wheelchairs and little ones on bikes, the shared path traces the beautiful Jervis Bay coastline, with plenty of places to stop for a swim or a snack en route.

Telegraph Creek Nature Trail

Natural Feature
Map View

Starting at the northern end of Green Patch car park, this easy, circular 2.4km (1.5mi) walk in Booderee National Park curls inland, passing through tall eucalypt forest, fern-lined creeks and swamps, as well as woodland and heath, with plenty of signs describing the vegetation along the way. Allow an hour to complete the loop, unless you plan to rest on the seats along the way to admire the spring wildflowers, which attract abundant birdlife.

Hyams Beach Trail

Natural Feature
Map View
The white sands of Hyams Beach in picturesque Jervis Bay with its turquoise waters, in New South Wales
© Genevieve Vallee / Alamy Stock Photo
Also known as the Bird Spotter’s walk, the 2km (1.2mi) Hyams Beach Trail begins at the end of Lister Crescent at the southern end of Hyams Beach Village and makes a short arc through Jervis Bay National Park before popping out on the beach. Birdwatchers will enjoy trying to spot eastern rosellas, crimson rosellas, new holland honeyeaters and eastern spinebills.
These recommendations were updated on July 10, 2020 to keep your travel plans fresh.