The Most Beautiful Towns and Places to Visit in Tasmania, Australia

Tasmania has many beautiful places to explore
Tasmania has many beautiful places to explore | © martin berry / Alamy Stock Photo
Photo of Kylie McDowell
4 December 2020

Tasmania has so many picturesque places to explore – from colourful waterfront villages to secluded islands and serene national parks and lakes. Check out these stunning locations.

Coles Bay

Architectural Landmark
Map View
Coles Bay
© Tourism Tasmania and Rob Burnett

Coastal town Coles Bay has stunning views of the pink-hued Hazards Mountains. The quaint holiday village is considered the gateway to Tassie’s Freycinet National Park and is next to picturesque Wineglass Bay. Explore the calm clear water of Coles Bay by kayak or go on a guided four-day walk along the Freycinet Peninsula. For a night of luxury, stay at the Freycinet Lodge, which is a series of timber cabins surrounded by nature overlooking the water.

Little Blue Lake

Natural Feature
Map View
Little Blue Lake, Tasmania
© Melissa Findley / Courtesy of Tourism Tasmania

The Little Blue Lake in the Far North Eastern corner of Tasmania is a natural phenomenon. The aqua-coloured water is the result of a high mineral content after pioneering mining and is breathtakingly beautiful. The turquoise lake is surrounded by the rugged South Mount Cameron landscape and although swimming is not recommended, it’s a memorable visit en route to the famous Bay of Fires.

Bay of Fires

Park
Map View
Aerial of Bay of Fires
© Stu Gibson / Courtesy of Tourism Tasmania
The Bay of Fires conservation reserve is more than 50 kilometres (31mi) of coastal beauty. Pristine white sandy beaches, crystal clear waters and striking lichen-covered rock formations make this one of Tasmania’s most popular places to visit. Binalong Bay beach is perfect for swimming, and there are plenty of walks to do. You could stay in a luxury eco-lodge on the water, or camp out surrounded by bushland at the Bay of Fires Bush Retreat.

Bruny Island

Natural Feature
Map View
Adventure Bay, Bruny Island
© Tourism Tasmania and Andrew McIntosh, Ocean Photography

Take to the sea, jump onto the Mirambeena (Bruny Island Ferry) to stunning Bruny Island. You can spy dolphins, eat oysters at Get Shucked Oyster Farm, visit the Cape Bruny Lighthouse, and settle into a contemporary timber cabin or a rustic shack designed for connecting with nature for the evening. Depending on the time of year, you might catch the Southern Lights.

Satellite Island

Natural Feature
Map View
Satellite Island
© Jason Charles Hill / Courtesy of Tourism Tasmania

Cross the D’Entrecasteaux Channel to one of Tasmania’s most beautiful places, secluded Satellite Island. Part of the Partridge Island Group, the tiny island is located between Bruny Island and mainland Tasmania. You could watch the sunset by a fire pit and spot sea eagles flying high from your own waterfront cabin. Explore the private island taking in the spectacular views, go fishing, shuck your own oysters straight from the sea or go swimming.

Mount Field National Park

Park
Map View
Russell Falls
© Jason Charles Hill / Courtesy of Tourism Tasmania

Get lost in nature at the serene Mount Field National Park, which lies 64 kilometres (40mi) northwest of Hobart. Part of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, the national park is one of Tasmania’s oldest and most stunning natural locations. Home to some of Tasmania’s most beautiful waterfalls, Russell Falls and Horseshoe Falls, there are plenty of reasons to visit the park. Go on an overnight hike, camp amongst the wilderness and surround yourself with ferns and eucalyptus trees.

Strahan

Architectural Landmark
Map View
Strahan Waterfront
© Stu Gibson / Courtesy of Tourism Tasmania

A small harbour-side village, Strahan is fast becoming one of Tasmania’s most visited towns. On the edge of the Tasmanian Wilderness World Heritage Area, colourful buildings sit right on the water at the northern end of Long Bay’s Macquarie Harbour. The surrounding natural areas are all part of the beauty. You could go on the Huon Pine Walk and Creepy Crawly Track before spending the night at a waterfront heritage cabin where you can stargaze out across the bay. Strahan is also the starting point for the West Coast Wilderness Railway, which is arguably one of the most stunning train trips in the world.

Cradle Mountain and Lake St Clair

Forest, Park
Map View
View of Dove Lake and Cradle Mountain, Tasmania
© Emilie Ristevski / Courtesy of Tourism Tasmania
Tasmania’s World Heritage-listed wilderness of Cradle Mountain National Park is brimming with natural beauty. You can climb Cradle Mountain, camp under the stars at Windermere Hut on the Overland Track, see the serene Dove Lake, and walk the Wombat Pool Track, Hansons Peak Boardwalk or take the Enchanted Walk. Spend the night on the water at the photogenic Pumphouse Point Hotel on Lake St Clair and take a rowboat out onto the lake or book a cruise.

Bridestowe Lavender Estate

Natural Feature
Map View
Bridestowe Lavender Estate
© Luke Tscharke / Courtesy of Tourism Tasmania

Just outside of Launceston is Australia’s largest lavender farm, Bridestowe Lavender Estate. One of Tasmania’s most popular tourist destinations, you can wander the endless purple fields and eat lavender ice cream at the photo-worthy gardens, which are in full bloom in December and January. The gardens are open all year round, and there are views further afield of Mount Arthur.

These recommendations were updated on December 4, 2020 to keep your travel plans fresh.

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