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Gordon Bennett, ‘Number Nine,’ 2008, acrylic paint on linen; Tate and the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, purchased jointly with funds provided by the Qantas Foundation 2016, image courtesy Museum of Contemporary Art Australia and Milani Gallery, Brisbane © The Estate of Gordon Bennett, 2016, photograph by Carl Warner | Courtesy MCA
Gordon Bennett, ‘Number Nine,’ 2008, acrylic paint on linen; Tate and the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, purchased jointly with funds provided by the Qantas Foundation 2016, image courtesy Museum of Contemporary Art Australia and Milani Gallery, Brisbane © The Estate of Gordon Bennett, 2016, photograph by Carl Warner | Courtesy MCA
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Kahlil Gibran-Inspired Exhibition Opens In Sydney

Picture of Monique La Terra
Updated: 5 September 2016
Launching on the first of September 2016, the Museum of Contemporary Art in Sydney presents MCA Collection: Today Tomorrow Yesterday. The exhibition explores the influence of history on contemporary art and the impressions that mid-twentieth-century ideas have left on modern artistic practices. Located on level two, this display will see the museum’s permanent collection re-hung for the first time since 2012, and the exhibition will be arranged so that each room presents an alternative perspective on contemporary Australia, Aboriginal, and Torres Strait Islander art.

Today Tomorrow Yesterday will include the work of more than 40 leading artists from the 1960s to today, including Sanné Mestrom, Stuart Ringholt, Callum Morton, Fiona Hall, Julia Gorman, Super Critical Mass, Gordon Bennett, Linda Marrinon, Barbara Cleveland Institute and Vernon Ah Kee. The exhibition will encompass all media drawn from the museum’s collections, along with recent acquisitions and new commissions.

The title, Today Tomorrow Yesterday reflects the challenge faced by MCA to curate a museum of currently relevant art pieces that maintain a historical context. The phrase is derived from the prose essay book The Prophet by Lebanese artist, philosopher and writer Kahlil Gibran who wrote: ‘…yesterday is but today’s memory, and tomorrow is today’s dream.’

Inspired by the psychological, emotional and cultural importance of early twentieth century modernist sculptors, artist Sanne Mestrom’s ‘Soft Kiss,’ 2011 is reminiscent of limestone sculptures such as ‘The Kiss’ by Constantin Brâncuși and ‘Tête’ by Amedeo Modigliani.

Sanné Mestrom, Soft Kiss, 2011, urethane rubber, found object, timber, Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with funds provided by the MCA Foundation, 2016, image courtesy and Sullivan + Strumpf © the artist

Sanné Mestrom, ‘Soft Kiss,’ 2011, urethane rubber, found object, timber; Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with funds provided by the MCA Foundation, 2016, image courtesy Sullivan and Strumpf © the artist | Courtesy MCA

Artist Stuart Ringholt explored the contrasting ideas of amplification and compression in his sculpture ‘Untitled (Clock),’ 2014. The mammoth mantle timepiece is three metres high and two metres wide; however, the hands move faster than usual, with an hour passing in 45 minutes and each day is shortened to 18 hours. This may be a comment on society’s rapid technological progress.

Stuart Ringholt, Untitled (Clock), 2014, clockwork, tubular bells, world globe, steel, glass, electronics, Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with funds provided by the MCA Foundation, 2014, image courtesy the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane © the artist, photograph: Andrew Curtis

Stuart Ringholt, ‘Untitled (Clock),’ 2014, clockwork, tubular bells, world globe, steel, glass, electronics; Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with funds provided by the MCA Foundation, 2014, image courtesy the artist and Milani Gallery, Brisbane © the artist, photograph by Andrew Curtis | Courtesy MCA

In Callum Morton’s ‘Monument #28: Vortex’ we are invited to look through a modern, life-size interpretation of a 1960s shopfront into a burrowed vortex which reveals Sydney’s Circular Quay. The installation is an observation on how the ordinary is often disrupted by unforeseen events.

Callum Morton, Monument #28: Vortex, 2011, polystyrene, epoxy resin, sand, wood, synthetic polymer paint, glass, 330 x 380 x 132 cm, Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with funds provided by the MCA Foundation, 2016

Callum Morton, ‘Monument #28: Vortex,’ 2011, polystyrene, epoxy resin, sand, wood, synthetic polymer paint, glass, 330 x 380 x 132 cm; Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with funds provided by the MCA Foundation, 2016 | Courtesy MCA

Today Tomorrow Yesterday will also see the former Maritime Services Boardroom transformed by Melbourne artist Julia Gorman. In homage to the building’s heritage, Gorman will revamp the room through abstract geometry in order to draw visitors into a space of discovery full of MCA resources and behind-the-scenes material.

Julia Gorman, Half In Half Out part 1, 2006, Vinyl, Uplands Gallery, Melbourne, 2006, image courtesy and © the artist, photograph: Andrius Lipsys

Julia Gorman, ‘Half In Half Out part 1,’ 2006, vinyl; Uplands Gallery, Melbourne, 2006, image courtesy and © the artist, photograph by Andrius Lipsys | Courtesy MCA

The museum has also partnered with the Qantas Foundation and Tate for an International Joint Acquisition Program, which will commence by presenting Gordon Bennett’s ‘Number Nine,’ 2008 as a part of the Today Tomorrow Yesterday exhibition. The painting differs from Bennett’s postcolonial political commentary. Instead, it explores the foundations and disposition of artistic dialects through repetitive lines.

Gordon Bennett, Number Nine, 2008, acrylic paint on linen, Tate and the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, purchased jointly with funds provided by the Qantas Foundation 2016, image courtesy Museum of Contemporary Art Australia and Milani Gallery, Brisbane © The Estate of Gordon Bennett, 2016, photograph: Carl Warner

Gordon Bennett, ‘Number Nine,’ 2008, acrylic paint on linen; Tate and the Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, purchased jointly with funds provided by the Qantas Foundation 2016, image courtesy Museum of Contemporary Art Australia and Milani Gallery, Brisbane © The Estate of Gordon Bennett, 2016, photograph by Carl Warner | Courtesy MCA

To coincide with Today Tomorrow Yesterday, MCA will launch its inaugural Artist Room exhibition, focused on the work of Melbourne artist Linda Marrion. Curated by Manya Sellers, the room will include a new commission as well as significant works from the 1980s, showcasing Marrion’s artistic transformation from painting to sculpture. The exhibition will include the sculpture ‘Edwardian Lady,’ 2008 and the painting ‘Sorry,’ 1992.

Linda Marrinon, Sorry, 1982, synthetic polymer paint on canvas, Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased 1990

Linda Marrinon, ‘Sorry,’ 1982, synthetic polymer paint on canvas; Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased 1990 | Courtesy MCA

Performance art, including the vocal stylings of Super Critical Mass and an honest investigation into performance laughter by the Barbara Cleveland Institute, is set to intrigue audiences.

Barbara Cleveland Institute (formerly Brown Council), One Hour Laugh, 2009, single-channel digital video, sound, 57:12 min, Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with assistance of Dr Edward Jackson AM and Mrs Cynthia Jackson AM, 2011, image courtesy and © the artists

Barbara Cleveland Institute (formerly Brown Council), ‘One Hour Laugh,’ 2009, single-channel digital video, sound, 57:12 min; Museum of Contemporary Art, purchased with assistance of Dr Edward Jackson AM and Mrs Cynthia Jackson AM, 2011, image courtesy and © the artists | Courtesy MCA

MCA Collection: Today Tomorrow Yesterday will run between the 1st of September, 2016 through to the 31st of August, 2018 and entry into the museum is free.

Museum of Contemporary Art Australia, 140 George St, The Rocks, NSW, Australia, +61 2