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Rosedale/Allendale Home | © Lars Ploughmann / Flickr
Rosedale/Allendale Home | © Lars Ploughmann / Flickr
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These Are the Coolest Neighborhoods in Austin

Picture of Jessica Devenyns
Updated: 23 March 2018
Austin, Texas has a place for everyone. With 150 people moving there every day, the city must have an appeal. However, if you want to move there, you must decide what neighborhood is the right fit for you. With so much to see, it can be difficult to discover what the coolest places in Austin are. So, here’s a quick guide to the coolest of the cool in the “city of weird.”

Cherrywood

Cherrywood
Cherrywood neighborhood | © Panoramio / WikiCommons

Cherrywood is just east of I-35 from the Hancock neighborhood, where Austin’s oldest golf course—established in 1899—is. Besides having easy access to nine holes (the back nine were converted into a shopping center in the 20th century), Cherrywood is filled with beautiful tree-lined streets. It is surrounded by the Manor district on the south side, and the north and east, which have excellent access to the main traffic arteries in the city.

Hyde Park

Hyde Park
Hildreth–Flanagan–Heierman House | © David E Hollingsworth / WikiCommons

Hyde Park is the original Austin suburb. When it was constructed in 1891, it was marketed as a “white only” neighborhood, filled with Queen Anne style homes. Today, however, it is filled with various students and professionals. On several of the central streets, the bungalows have been converted into businesses. So if you want “Austin original,” but don’t want the hustle and bustle of downtown, make your way to this community-centric neighborhood just north of the University of Texas campus.

Holly

Unlike many of the other neighborhoods that are populated with longtime residents, Holly has attracted a lot of Austin transplants. Bordering Lady Bird Lake on the east side of town is the eclectic Holly neighborhood. Historically an area of town inhabited by Austin’s Latino population, the vibe is slowly changing. Now there are food trailers, bars, and restaurants on every corner. The area is a popular late-night destination for Austinites who don’t live in this part of town. If you like trendy food and hip coffee shops, mixed with piñata stores and Mexican groceries, then this is a great spot to be. Be sure to sample Laundurette and Hummus Among Us if you’re hungry.

Bouldin Creek

Just off South 1st Street is one of Austin’s oldest neighborhoods, the Bouldin Creek neighborhood. Christened in the 1850s, the colonel who owned the land farmed it as a plantation, but in the decades that followed, the area morphed into a sleepy little corner of town, populated by bungalows that dot the undulating terrain. In fact, some of the neighborhood streets are high enough to give you one of the few uninterrupted views of downtown from the city. Not to mention that it has some of the best access to downtown, South 1st, and Oltorf Street, where you can eat, drink, and be merry any time of the week. If you need a break from wandering around, try Mattie’s or Lenoir.

Clarksville

Clarksville
Sweet Home Baptist Church in Clarksville | © Larry D. Moore / WikiCommons

Founded by freedman Charles Clark in 1871, Clarksville is the oldest surviving freedomtown west of the Mississippi. However, demographics changed through the centuries, especially after the City Council made it impossible for African Americans to have access to city utilities while they were living in that part of town. Now, Clarksville is a ritzy, sought-after neighborhood. Today, this part of town is filled with beautifully restored homes that are surrounded by all the amenities you could possibly need: a grocery store, drug store, cleaners, restaurants, etc. These destinations are great if you don’t feel like making the quarter-mile walk into the heart of downtown.

Allendale

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Rosedale/Allendale Home | © Lars Ploughmann / Flickr

Allendale is an oddly-situated neighborhood just to the north of downtown. It is sandwiched on either side by major transportation corridors and commercial space. This is, however, what makes the area so convenient to live in. The beautiful tree-lined streets seem a world away from the busy traffic just around the corner. Plus, it’s only a hop, skip, and a jump away from the medical district which is great if you are a klutz.

Zilker

Zilker
Sunset over ACL Music Festival | © eric wittman / Flickr

Zilker Park is Austin’s largest green space. Donated in 1918 by Andrew Jackson Zilker—a politician and philanthropist—the area only began to become suburbanized in the late 1920s. However, in tandem with the building of homes, the City of Austin preserved the original 35-acre donation which now hosts some of Austin’s most notable destinations like the Umlauf Sculpture Garden, Barton Springs Pool, Austin City Limits Music Festival, and the Zilker Trail of Lights.

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While there is no proper name for this area of town, it is all the things that people love about South Austin, without the price tag. Just south of the urban core division of Highway 290, this neighborhood is made up of a hodgepodge of homes from the 1960s and 1970s. Surrounding the neighborhoods, however, are plenty of up-and-coming businesses like JuiceLand, Casa Brasil, and Spokesman Coffee. This type of development means property values are sure to increase steadily in this area.