airport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar
Sign In
Prague | © Roman Boed/Flickr
Prague | © Roman Boed/Flickr
Save to wishlist

10 Struggles Every Texan Faces Abroad

Picture of Aubrey Cofield
Updated: 9 August 2017
Everyone to some extent faces struggles when traveling, whether domestically or abroad. Each country comes with its own unique cultures and customs; Texas, however, feels like a country all on its own and residents find themselves facing preconceived ideas of what Texans are like and justifying cultural norms to foreigners. This leads to a unique experience abroad for those on both sides of the fence.

Does Everyone Ride Horses?

There’s a common misconception traveling abroad that everyone in Texas rides horses and that’s simply not true. While Texas does love horseback riding, there are many Texas residents who have never ridden on a horse. In fact, Texas’ biggest cities like Dallas and Houston are extremely metropolitan.

Texas Horse & Cattle Drive © Anne Worner/Flickr
Texas Horse & Cattle Drive | © Anne Worner/Flickr

American Football Abroad

Texas loves American football, more than most cities across the United States. For many Texans it can prove surprising to find out that nowhere else in the country is American Football quite as popular.

Pronunciation

Pronunciation isn’t most Texans’ forte. Texans have a way of pronouncing words that sound completely unique to Texas. Traveling abroad often means a new language or at least a different way of pronouncing words in your own language, and Texans may find this the most challenging task of all.

The Accent

Whether native Texans like it or not, over the years a slight accent develops no matter how hard you try to keep it at bay. But not only does an accent develop, usually Texans don’t realise how strong it’s become and always seem genuinely surprised when everyone is quick to point it out.

All Texans Love the Cowboys

The stereotype that all Texans love the Dallas Cowboys football team is false. When traveling abroad a way for locals to connect with visitors is to talk about your hometown sports teams. Often times when you mention you’re from Texas someone will bring up the Cowboys, which can get awkward for the many Texans who don’t care too much for the team – or even football in general.

Dallas Cowboys Stadium © Mahanga/Flickr
Dallas Cowboys Stadium | © Mahanga/Flickr

Driving in Snow or Ice

Traveling abroad where the roads are icy and the snow is plentiful means no Texan should be driving. In Texas during the few days the temperatures reach low enough to create semi-icy roads everything is shut down because residents are aware of the simple fact that they just aren’t the best at driving in snowy or icy conditions due to lack of experience.

Everything is Bigger in Texas

It’s a known fact that everything is bigger in Texas – well – possibly only known to Texans. This often sparks a conversation on how many things are in fact bigger in Texas. From big hair to big pride a lot of things prove bigger in Texas and everyone is curious as to why.

San Antonio Boots © Nan Palmero/Flickr
San Antonio Boots | © Nan Palmero/Flickr

Y’all

Going abroad Texans are often called out for their constant use of ‘y’all.’ Depending on how you look at it this can either be a struggle or even a conversation starter.

Not Everyone is a Cowboy/Cowgirl

Going abroad for Texans usually entails a conversation explaining you’re not a cowboy/cowgirl. The state itself – although it does count authentic cowboys and cowgirls amongst its residents – is fairly progressive with large cities and modern technology.

Groesback, Texas © Prayitno/Flickr
Groesback, Texas | © Prayitno/Flickr

Not Everyone Loves Texas

With Texas pride comes the misconception that everyone knows about and loves Texas. This is not entirely true. While some people just don’t care for Texas, others have barely heard a thing about the Lone Star State. This is a troublesome reality many Texans traveling abroad learn when they leave home.