airport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar
Explore your world
Cancel
© Durch Endla/Shutterstock
© Durch Endla/Shutterstock

New York's Premier Sex Museum Brings BDSM Out of the Closet

Picture of Jill Di Donato
Fashion Editor
Updated: 26 January 2018

On 25 January, New York’s premier sex museum, the Museum of Sex, hosted a steamy cam girl-themed launch party for the label OHTNYC, a mix of BDSM and streetwear. In case you missed it, here’s a recap.

The rise of BDSM—bondage and discipline (B&D), domination and submission (D&S), and sadism and masochism (S&M)—in popular culture marks the era of sex positivity. Once considered a dirty fetish, BDSM has entered the mainstream, largely due to the popularity of the Fifty Shades of Grey franchise (which many critics have incidentally cited as misappropriating BDSM practices, but that’s besides the point).

Courtesy of OHTNYC

Courtesy of OHTNYC

Additionally, it is arguable that the mainstreaming of feminism and body positivity has helped to erase the shame once associated with what you choose to do with or have done to your body.

OHTNYC_introduction+looks-8

Courtesy of OHTNYC

In the #MeToo and #TimesUp era, American culture has been tasked with taking a hard look at the true meaning of consent. Current events, the Aziz Ansari incident most aptly comes to mind, lead to the conclusion that men and women have been programmed by institutional notions of masculinity and femininity to formulate different notions about consent. It’s certainly not helpful that the American president is on record for dismissing rape culture as “locker room talk” (a comment he made in the second presidential debate, which aired on October 9, 2016) and the infamous “p*ssy grab” comment. How has this friction between blatant disregard for consent and the pushback that has ensued trickled down to the clothing we wear? For one thing, today’s social and cultural climate is no longer staying silent about former taboo subjects.

When people start a dialogue about issues like consent, it’s only natural to wear your mindset on your sleeve, so to speak. Fashion as a visual language has always communicated touchstones of zeitgeist. So it’s apt that fashion designers add their voices to the current consent dialectic.

Courtesy of OHTNYC

Courtesy of OHTNYC

OHTNYC’s cam girl-inspired collection does just that. The clothing, pioneered by New York designer, Jinsol Woo, is a tribute to voyeurism and the pleasure people get from watching others. Cam girls, or women who enter a willing relationship to be watched online (and paid by their viewers), certainly sparks a progressive notion of consent. Likewise, BDSM is reliant on consent, otherwise, this behavior loses its pleasure and is predatory. Woo’s vision for the debut of OHTNYC  is that wearers feel as sexy and liberated with these garments on as they do when naked. A tall order, but the layered silhouettes and asymmetrical patterns of this line are an exciting start.

Visit New York’s Museum of Sex at 233 Fifth Avenue at the corner of East 27th Street.

Purchase OHTNYC online.