airport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar
Explore your world
Cancel
Max Beckmann, Paris Society, 1931. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Photo credit: The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation/Art Resource, NY © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn.
Max Beckmann, Paris Society, 1931. The Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. Photo credit: The Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation/Art Resource, NY © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York / VG Bild-Kunst, Bonn.

New York City Museum Exhibitions We're Looking Forward to in 2018

Picture of Rachel Gould
Art & Design Editor
Updated: 8 January 2018

New year, new program of blockbuster exhibitions in New York City. From the Costume Institute’s highly anticipated survey of Catholic fashion at The Met to the Brooklyn Museum’s comprehensive retrospective of David Bowie’s career, here’s a sampling of must-see museum offerings in 2018.

Thomas Cole’s Journey: Atlantic Crossings

January 30–May 13, 2018

Thomas Cole, <em>View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a Thunderstorm</em>—<em>The Oxbow</em>, 1836. Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

Thomas Cole, View from Mount Holyoke, Northampton, Massachusetts, after a ThunderstormThe Oxbow, 1836. Courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art

English-born artist Thomas Cole immigrated to the United States and became one of the most influential painters of 19th-century New York. Credited as the founder of the Hudson River School, an art movement whose practitioners depicted romantic, pastoral landscapes, he painted the infinite grandeur of the American wilderness and bucolic allegorical works. On view at The Met Fifth Avenue, Thomas Cole’s Journey will follow the artist from England to the United States, back to England, then to Italy, on the 200th anniversary of his first Atlantic crossing in 1818.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10028

2018 Triennial: Songs for Sabotage

February 13–May 27, 2018

Janiva Ellis, <em>The Okiest Doke</em>, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, New York. Photo: Joerg Lohse

Janiva Ellis, The Okiest Doke, 2017. Courtesy of the artist and 47 Canal, New York. Photo: Joerg Lohse

The New Museum kicks off 2018 with its fourth triennial, Songs for Sabotage. The exhibition will “propose a kind of propaganda, engaging with new and traditional media in order to reveal the built systems that construct our reality, images, and truths.” Songs for Sabotage will give some 30 artists hailing from 19 countries—many of whom are new to American audiences—a platform from which to challenge and interfere with contemporary networks and structures through socially and politically-charged, multidisciplinary artworks.

New Museum, 235 Bowery, New York, NY 10002

William Eggleston: Los Alamos

February 14–May 28, 2018

William Eggleston, <em>Memphis</em>, 1965–68. © Eggleston Artistic Trust. Courtesy of David Zwirner, New York/London/Hong Kong

William Eggleston, Memphis, 1965–68. © Eggleston Artistic Trust. Courtesy of David Zwirner, New York/London/Hong Kong

The Met Fifth Avenue will host New York City’s first comprehensive exhibition of Los Alamos, a series of 75 dye transfer pints from color negatives created by premier American photographer William Eggleston. A pioneer of color photography from the early 1960s onward, Eggleston has captured some of the most iconic American snapshots in photographic history.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10028

David Bowie is

March 2–July 15, 2018

Striped bodysuit for the <em>Aladdin Sane</em> tour, 1973. Design by Kansai Yamamoto. Photograph by Masayoshi Sukita. © Sukita/The David Bowie Archive

Striped bodysuit for the Aladdin Sane tour, 1973. Design by Kansai Yamamoto. Photograph by Masayoshi Sukita. © Sukita/The David Bowie Archive

This touring exhibition of approximately 400 objects from David Bowie’s personal archive will take its final bow at the Brooklyn Museum this year. David Bowie is will thoroughly examine the creative process of a larger-than-life artist, whose expansive career and revolutionary spirit not only changed the trajectory of music, but fashion and art, and contemporary culture.

Brooklyn Museum, 200 Eastern Parkway, Brooklyn, New York 11238

Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables

March 2–June 10, 2018

Grant Wood, <em>American Gothic</em>, 1930. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photograph courtesy of Art Institute of Chicago/Art Resource, NY

Grant Wood, American Gothic, 1930. © Figge Art Museum, successors to the Estate of Nan Wood Graham/Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY. Photograph courtesy of Art Institute of Chicago/Art Resource, NY

While Grant Wood’s double portrait of a farmer and his wife (plus what must be the world’s most famous pitchfork) stands as an Americana paradigm, the Whitney Museum endeavors to showcase the artist’s expansive career beyond his magnum opus. “Grant Wood: American Gothic and Other Fables brings together the full range of his art, from his early arts and crafts decorative objects and impressionist oils through his mature paintings, murals, and book illustrations” to reveal a complex practice that sought peace and prosperity amid the suffering and uncertainty of the Great Depression.

Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014

Before the Fall: German and Austrian Art of the 1930s

March 8–May 28, 2018

7. Richard Oelze, Expectation, 1935-36

Richard Oelze, Expectation, 1935-36. The Museum of Modern Art, New York. Digital Image © The Museum of Modern Art / Licensed by SCALA / Art Resource, NY

New York’s premier museum for early 20th-century German and Austrian art will host an exhibition of artworks created during an infamous time of political upheaval and humanitarian crisis. Through the examination of nearly 150 artworks by internationally renowned names including Max Beckmann, Otto Dix, Max Ernst, and Oskar Kokoschka amongst lesser-known artists from that era and region, Before the Fall at the Neue Galerie will demonstrate the themes and aesthetics that reigned supreme as World War II loomed.

Neue Galerie, 1048 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10028

Marc Camille Chaimowicz: Your Place or Mine…

March 16–August 5, 2018

Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Installation view of the exhibition <em>Now and then…</em> | Image courtesy of the artist and Cabinet, London

Marc Camille Chaimowicz, Installation view of the exhibition Now and then… | Image courtesy of the artist and Cabinet, London

This year, the Jewish Museum will host Marc Camille Chaimowicz’s first American solo exhibition. The Paris-born, London-based performance/installation artist emerged in the 1970s and garnered notoriety for his immersive artworks that play with space and perception. Your Place or Mine… will present the objects, sculptures, paintings, videos, and collages created by Chaimowicz over the course of his career, with new artworks made specifically for the Jewish Museum’s forthcoming survey.

Jewish Museum, 1109 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10128

Being: New Photography 2018

March 18–August 19, 2018

Aïda Muluneh,<em> All in One</em>, 2016. Pigmented inkjet print, 31 1/2 × 31 1/2″ (80 × 80 cm). Courtesy of the artist and David Krut Projects. © 2017 Aïda Muluneh

Aïda Muluneh, All in One, 2016. Pigmented inkjet print, 31 1/2 × 31 1/2″ (80 × 80 cm). Courtesy of the artist and David Krut Projects. © 2017 Aïda Muluneh

The Museum of Modern Art’s (MoMA) forthcoming New Photography show, Being, will consider the various complexities of moments and lived experiences captured by 17 local and international photographers. The New Photography series began in 1985, born from a growing curiosity about how photography was changing the scope of contemporary art. The 2018 edition of this enduring program “investigates charged and layered notions of personhood and subjectivity in recent photography and photo-based art.”

Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

Like Life: Sculpture, Color, and the Body (1300–Now)

March 21–July 22, 2018

Greer Lankton, <em>Rachel</em>, 1986. Collection of Eric Ceputis and David W. Williams, promised gift to the Art Institute of Chicago. Greer Lankton Archives Museum. Photo: The Art Institute of Chicago/Art Resource, NY

Greer Lankton, Rachel, 1986. Collection of Eric Ceputis and David W. Williams, promised gift to the Art Institute of Chicago. Greer Lankton Archives Museum. Photo: The Art Institute of Chicago/Art Resource, NY

The Met Breuer takes on the monumental task of surveying over 700 years of sculpture for Like Life. Comprised of loans from museums and private collections around the world, this unprecedented showcase of sculptural practice through the centuries will exhibit some 120 renderings of the human body as depicted by major historical figures such as El Greco and Auguste Rodin, alongside modern masters like Louise Bourgeois and contemporary artists Isa Genzken and Jeff Koons.

The Met Breuer, 945 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10021

Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination

May 10–October 8, 2018

Evening Dress, Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli for Valentino, spring/summer 2014 haute couture; Courtesy of Valentino S.p.A. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Digital Composite Scan by Katerina Jebb

Evening Dress, Maria Grazia Chiuri and Pierpaolo Piccioli for Valentino, spring/summer 2014 haute couture; Courtesy of Valentino S.p.A. Image courtesy of The Metropolitan Museum of Art, Digital Composite Scan by Katerina Jebb

The 2018 Costume Institute exhibition will explore the symbols and aesthetics of religious fashion through the centuries. Hosted at both The Met Fifth Avenue and The Met Cloisters in Upper Manhattan, Heavenly Bodies: Fashion and the Catholic Imagination will juxtapose religious garments with works of medieval and Byzantine art from the museum’s vast collections to “examine the relationship between creativity and religious imagination.” Amongst the items to be showcased are a selection of papal robes and jewels that will be exhibited outside the Vatican for the first time in history.

The Metropolitan Museum of Art, 1000 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10028

The Met Cloisters, 99 Margaret Corbin Drive, New York, NY 10040

Giacometti

June 8–September 16, 2018

Alberto Giacometti, <em>The Nose </em>(<em>Le Nez</em>), 1947 (cast 1949). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP/FAAG, Paris

Alberto Giacometti, The Nose (Le Nez), 1947 (cast 1949). Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, New York. © 2017 Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York/ADAGP/FAAG, Paris

This summer, the Guggenheim will exhibit over 175 artworks by legendary Swiss artist Alberto Giacometti in what will be the first major American museum showcase of the renowned sculptor’s work in 15 years. Giacometti will juxtapose the artist’s drawings and paintings alongside the elongated, otherworldly figures that he is best known for to trace his forays into cubism and surrealism, and map his influence by traditional African and Oceanic aesthetics.

Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, 1071 5th Avenue, New York, NY 10128

Bruce Nauman: Disappearing Acts

October 21, 2018–March 17, 2019

Bruce Nauman, <i>Learned Helplessness in Rats </i>(<i>Rock and Roll Drummer</i>), 1988. © 2015 Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Bruce Nauman, Learned Helplessness in Rats (Rock and Roll Drummer), 1988. © 2015 Bruce Nauman/Artists Rights Society (ARS), New York

Best known for his jarring sculptures and neon works, Bruce Nauman has established a legendary, cross-disciplinary practice in his 50-year career. Organized by MoMA, MoMA PS1, and Schaulager, Basel, Disappearing Acts will serve as the artist’s first retrospective in more than two decades. The landmark survey will be held at both MoMA and MoMA PS1 in Long Island City.

Museum of Modern Art, 11 West 53rd Street, New York, NY 10019

MoMA PS1, 22-25 Jackson Avenue, Long Island City, NY 11101

Harry Potter: A History of Magic

October 2018

Following its inaugural run at the British Library last autumn, Harry Potter: A History of Magic will make its way to the New-York Historical Society in October 2018 (exact dates TBD). The exhibition of “rare books, manuscripts, and magical objects from the British Library’s collection” will coincide with the 20th anniversary of Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone, which first graced American audiences via Scholastic in the fall of 1998.

New-York Historical Society, 170 Central Park West, New York, NY 10024

 

Andy Warhol

November 2018

68.25

Andy Warhol, Green Coca-Cola Bottles, 1962. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York; purchase with funds from the Friends of the Whitney Museum of American Art © 2017 The Andy Warhol Foundation for the visual Arts, Inc./ Artists Rights Society (ARS), N.Y.

After almost 30 years, the Whitney will host a comprehensive survey of Andy Warhol’s game-changing practice. Opening in November (exact dates to be announced in the coming months), Andy Warhol will explore the entirety of the artist’s career in depth, beyond the Campbell’s soup cans and the Coca-Cola bottles that he became so famous for. This landmark retrospective will serve as the first organized by an American institution since 1989, as well as the largest solo show held at the museum’s Meatpacking location to date.

Whitney Museum of American Art, 99 Gansevoort Street, New York, NY 10014