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Meet Eva Gajzer, the Business Healer
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Meet Eva Gajzer, the Business Healer

Picture of Esme Benjamin
Wellness Editor
Updated: 30 April 2018
The name of Eva Gajzer’s business is the first clue: Oneness. A word that denotes unity—the core focus of her conscious consultancy service—and also hints at new age philosophy. The second is her demeanor: savvy and professional but oozing empathy, openness, and understanding. You see, Gajzer’s other vocational calling is shamanism.

Her practice is rooted in the Q’ero lineage—a tradition that originated in Peru more than 5,000 years ago. The Q’eros fled to the high Andes after the Spanish conquistadors invaded in the 1500s, and by avoiding detection were able to preserve their ancient healing knowledge and spiritual traditions, passing them down from mentor to seeker.

Although shamanism doesn’t feature overtly in Oneness’s approach, the company’s ethos of helping business strive for the “quadruple bottom line”—profit, people, social, and environmental—is infused with shamanic influence. The first step is to decipher if a client’s brand platform is resonating at a high level to create truly meaningful success and impact; are the employees working harmoniously? is leadership empowering its people? does the brand have authenticity and purpose?

“It’s very much about connecting and creating a greater source of support,” she explains. “It’s moving beyond some of these human challenges of jealousy or competition within the workplace and letting the team really step into powerful alignment and activation with the brand experience. When stuff like that happens, success flows.”

Gajzer cut her teeth in the Brand Innovation Group within Ogilvy & Mather, helping to reshape brands including Dove, American Express, and the Olympics; but her initial career focus was high-end fashion buying. It makes sense, then, that many of Oneness’s clients are in the luxury industry. “Really the focus here, with the industries that we’re connecting with, is fashion and beauty,” plus some tech, she explains. “Because I find that these are people who are actually committed to incredible creativity and beauty, but the exact opposite is happening in the way individuals within the culture are disconnected and challenged. This affects a business deeply since the entire team isn’t stepping into its full power.”

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Offices can be incubators for politics and gossip, and just because a group of co-workers is having happy hour together doesn’t mean they’re genuinely bonding. When asked what kinds of conditions conspire to make a work environment “low vibe,” Gajzer cites unexpected layoffs and changes of management—the kind of issues that breed insecurity and instability within a team. But problems such as these can be overcome, she says. “[They] are opportunities to shift, you know? Just like whenever we have a hard moment [in life], that’s actually an opportunity for us to really surrender, get into it and transform our wounds into sources of profound strength.”

Besides Gajzer herself, there are four other experts in the Oneness team—mostly organizational psychologists and business strategists from Columbia University, plus a neuroscientist. Several are also yoga teachers and holistic practitioners. These “secret healers” work with the C suite at a business, conduct qualitative and quantitative research, and then create and execute a strategy for fixing core issues. From there they can build a cohesive brand that empowers every individual to do their best work for themselves, the company, humanity, and our planet. It’s a process that Gajzer emphasizes is “very buttoned up,” but there’s nothing cold or corporate about it—clients’ businesses get a huge injection of wellness when they work with Oneness.

“You shouldn’t have to feel like you’re only getting your fix in morning meditation or going to yoga after work,” she says. “Integrating certain activities where people are collaborating, sitting in a circle, sharing, surrendering, standing in their power, and weaving yoga, intention and manifestation—all of this should be happening at work too.” The return on investment for any company that makes space for wellness in the workplace, she notes, is a 5-10% uptick in staff productivity.

By focusing on the wellbeing of its people, the business itself is transformed. If you can make every individual within a team feel supported, valued, respected, and empowered, that will naturally coalesce into a better product. And from the customer’s perspective, perhaps a more genuine and resonant brand worthy of their loyalty, engagement and hard-earned money. Oneness is a win-win.