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Exceptional Hieronymus Bosch Goes on Show in Kansas

Detail of Hieronymus Bosch, <em>The Temptation of St. Anthony</em>, ca. 1500-1510 | Courtesy The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Detail of Hieronymus Bosch, <em>The Temptation of St. Anthony</em>, ca. 1500-1510 | Courtesy The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art
Scientific techniques have confirmed the authenticity of Hieronymus Bosch’s The Temptation of St. Anthony, which is to go back on view at The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City on June 30.

Part of the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art’s collection for a number of years, the exquisitely painted The Temptation of St. Anthony had came under scrutiny by scholars believing the painting to be by one of Bosch’s followers.

Last on view at the museum in 2003, it was an underdrawing revealed through infrared image technology used by a team of experts researching the painting’s correct attribution that confirmed the panel was indeed by Bosch. It is believed to be part of a larger dismantled triptych.

Hieronymus Bosch, The Temptation of St. Anthony, ca. 1500-1510 Courtesy The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri.

The significance of these two recent attributions, made possible through scientific and scholarly research, cannot be overstated,’ said Julián Zugazagoitia, Director of the Nelson-Atkins. ‘We are delighted to celebrate these transformative achievements with Kansas City and the international arts community as we see these paintings with new eyes.’

Recently on loan to the Het Noordbrabants Museum, in Bosch’s hometown of ‘s-Hertogenbosch, for a major retrospective commemorating the 500th anniversary of the artist’s death, the confirmation is momentous considering how little of the artist’s work there is, with only a handful currently on view in the United States.

Albrecht Bouts, Christ Crowned with Thorns, ca. 1490-1495 Courtesy The Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art, Kansas City, Missouri.

The panel along with the extraordinary Christ Crowned with Thorns, an early Netherlandish painting which has also been recently confirmed as the work of Albrecht Bouts, will go on view in What Lies Beneath: Rediscovering Hieronymus Bosch and Albrecht Bouts.

The exhibition will focus on the academic and scientific techniques used to determine the paintings attribution, giving the public unique insight into the working methods of these important Netherlandish painters.