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A View Unfettered © Orin Zebest/Flickr
A View Unfettered © Orin Zebest/Flickr

Abandoned Spaces And Buildings To Explore In The San Francisco Bay Area

Picture of Samantha Cardenas
Samantha Cardenas
Updated: 9 February 2017
Abandoned buildings to the naked eye are just that, abandoned and forgotten. But to an adventurer, abandoned buildings are full of history and stories waiting to be told. Take the day to explore our selections for abandoned buildings and spaces in the Bay Area.

Cosson Hall

Serving as a naval base in the late 1960s for many sailors, Cosson Hall on Treasure Island is just one of many abandoned establishments visitors frequent. Now it is home to adventurers snapping pictures of the graffiti covered building.

Cosson Hall, 601 Avenue A, San Francisco, CA, USA

DSC02681 | © Ever Falling/Flickr

DSC02681 | © Ever Falling/Flickr

The Bayshore Roundhouse

Built in 1910, the Bayshore Roundhouse was a place of residency for freight engines. As business grew, the roundhouse turned into quite the complex, housing upwards of 60 inbound and outbound tracks, store buildings, a freight yard shop and a hospital to service the thousands of employees working there. The roundhouse was abandoned in 1982 ruined by a fire in 2001, but that hasn’t stopped thrill-seekers from sneaking onto the premises to do some exploring.

The Bayshore Roundhouse, 2800 Bayshore Blvd, Brisbane, CA, USA

Roundhouse, The Arches Round Back | © Orin Zebest/Flickr

Roundhouse, The Arches Round Back | © Orin Zebest/Flickr

J’s Amusement Park

First opened in the 1960s, J’s Amusement Park provided Guerneville residents with wholesome America fun. Housing classic rides from roller coasters to scrambler rides, the park was the place to be up until its closing in 2003. Since then it has hosted Dr. Evil’s House of Horrors and has been a premier camping spot.

J’s Amusement Park, 16101 Neeley Rd, Guerneville, CA, USA

J's Amusements | © Nick Fisher/Flickr

J’s Amusements | © Nick Fisher/Flickr

The Ghost Fleet

Travel to Benicia to bask in the historical glory that is the Ghost Fleet. Check out old, abandoned WWII and Vietnam War ships in the Suisun Bay.

The Ghost Fleet, Suisun Bay Reserve Fleet, Benicia, CA, USA

16th Street Station

Opened in 1912, 16th Street Station at the time was something Oakland was very proud to claim as its own. The station put Oakland on the map as being a major transportation hub.

16th Street Station, Oakland, CA, USA

!6th Street | © Nick Fisher/Flickr

16th Street | © Nick Fisher/Flickr

Fleishhacker Pool

In 1925, San Francisco opened one of the largest outdoor heated swimming pools just off of Sloat Boulevard. This pool served residents for more 40 years until it closed in 1971 due to underfunding and poor maintenance. The final straw came when the cost of repairs was more than the city could afford, and the city finally decided to shut it down completely and convert it into a parking lot, which now serves San Francisco Zoo visitors.

Fleishhacker Pool, San Francisco, CA, USA

Untitled | © Marc Tarlock/Flickr

© Marc Tarlock/Flickr

Byron Hot Springs Hotel

If creepy, abandoned hotels are your thing, take a drive to Byron, Calif., and visit the once vibrant Byron Hot Springs Hotel. The hotel served as an army interrogation center during WWII, a monastery in the mid to late 50s and a resort.

Byron Hot Springs Hotel, Old Byron Hot Springs Hotel, Byron, CA, USA

Byron Hot Springs Resort | © Tobin/Flickr

Byron Hot Springs Resort | © Tobin/Flickr