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©Lady Gaga via Facebook

What Women In America Wore To Vote Because Pantsuit Nation Will Rise Up

Picture of Jill Di Donato
Jill Di Donato
Fashion Editor
Updated: 9 November 2016
The trio of fashion, feminism, and politics isn’t new. In fact, last century, the Suffragettes knew this, and used fashion as a weapon to brand themselves as smart and savvy to gain respect in the public eye. In the wake of former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s defeat in the bid for president, and as a nation struggling to cope with the division present in Trump’s victory, it’s important to honor the pantsuit as a symbol of resilience and strength. The United States will need symbols of honor and duty in the days to come. With that in mind, Culture Trip pays tribute to 10 women who sartorially rocked the vote, and used their garments to represent an unflinching power.

 

It’s hard not to feel the weight of sexism and misogyny that may or may not have been at play in the decision to elect business mogul Donald J. Trump president over a candidate who spent over 30 years in public service fighting for the rights of women and children. Many people were hopeful that history, or “herstory,” was going to be made last night with the United States ushering in its first female commander in chief. Such was not the case.

A century ago, Suffragettes wore purple for loyalty and dignity, white for purity, and green for hope, according to The Guardian. Yesterday, women wore a variety of garments that signified their power. Despite the outcome of this election, these women continue to be fierce.

Wearing purple (a nod to the Suffragettes?) on the lapel of her black pantsuit, Clinton made the following remarks in her concession speech:

“You represent the best of America. And being your candidate has been one of the biggest honors of my life … This is painful and it will be for a long time … I still believe in America and I always will … We must accept this result and look to the future. There are more seasons to come and more work to be done.”

Wendy Chin-Tanner, Portland, Oregon

wendy-chin-tanner

©Wendy Chin-Tanner, Portland, Oregon

Madonna, New York City, New York

©Madonna, New York City

©Madonna via Facebook, New York City, New York

 

Leah Umansky, New York City, New York

©Leah Umansky, New York City , New York

©Leah Umansky, New York City, New York

 

Samantha Bee, New York City, New York

©Samantha Bee via Facebook, New York City, New York

©Samantha Bee via Facebook, New York City, New York

 

Betony Toht and Jayna Maleri, Brooklyn, New York

Betony Toht and Jayna Maleri, Brooklyn, New York

©Betony Toht and Jayna Maleri, Brooklyn, New York

Otherwild

©Otherwild via Instagram

©Otherwild via Instagram

Flåm V Rosemålin, Portland, Oregon

©Flåm V Rosemålin, Portland, Oregon

©Flåm V Rosemålin, Portland, Oregon

 

Rebecca Solnit, New York City, New York

©Rebecca Solnit, via Facebook

©Rebecca Solnit, via Facebook, New York City, New York

 

Emily Ziff Griffin and Family, Los Angeles, California

©Emily Ziff Griffin and Family, Los Angeles, California

©Emily Ziff Griffin and Family, Los Angeles, California

Lady Gaga, New York City, New York

©Lady Gaga via Facebook, New York City, New York

©Lady Gaga via Facebook, New York City, New York