airport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar
Explore your world
Cancel
Willa Nasatir, installation view, Ghebaly Gallery, September 16 - October 29, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane
Willa Nasatir, installation view, Ghebaly Gallery, September 16 - October 29, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Up-And-Coming Contemporary Artists From The US

Picture of Alexia Wulff
Updated: 1 December 2016
The purpose of art is washing the dust of daily life off our souls. – Pablo Picasso

Everyone needs a little washing of the soul. Whether that means discovering the meaning of outdoor dance installations, or delving into the fairytale lands of an oil painting, art has a way of arousing critical thought and imagination – even for the viewer. So go on, and explore America’s star-studded list of emerging contemporary artists.


Letha Wilson

Wilson’s installations dance between the lines of photography and sculpture, twisting and contorting flat images into three-dimensional, textured works of art. Hawaii-born Letha Wilson, a mixed media artist, highlights the beauty of American landscapes, meanwhile tying in elements of the man-made, using concrete, metal, and cement bases. Currently living in Brooklyn, New York, she has an exhibition on view at New York’s University at Albany Art Museum until December 10, 2016, and Columbus Museum of Art until January 8, 2017.

Kauai Green Concrete Bend, 2014 C-prints, emulsion transfer, concrete, aluminum frame 60 1/2 x 45 1/2 x 2 inches | Courtesy of Letha Wilson

Kauai Green Concrete Bend, 2014 C-prints, emulsion transfer, concrete, aluminum frame 60 1/2 x 45 1/2 x 2 inches | Courtesy of Letha Wilson

California Sunset Lean, 2014 digital print on vinyl, wood, hole in wall Installation approx 12’ x 6’ x 18’. Print size: 6’ x 8’ Installation view of Ad Infinitum, American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington, DC. | Courtesy of Letha Wilson

California Sunset Lean, 2014 digital print on vinyl, wood, hole in wall Installation approx 12’ x 6’ x 18’. Print size: 6’ x 8’ Installation view of Ad Infinitum, American University Museum at the Katzen Arts Center, Washington, DC. | Courtesy of Letha Wilson

Joshua Tree Steel Cut (Slash), 2015 C-print, steel 24” x 20” | Courtesy of Letha Wilson

Joshua Tree Steel Cut (Slash), 2015
Joshua Tree Steel Cut (Slash), 2015 C-print, steel 24” x 20” | Courtesy of Letha Wilson24” x 20”

Installation view, Solo exhibition at Higher Pictures, 2014 Skyfall Wallbreak California, 2014 UV print on dibond, wood, hole in wall 96 x 96 x 7/8 inches | Courtesy of Letha Wilson

Installation view, Solo exhibition at Higher Pictures, 2014 Skyfall Wallbreak California, 2014 UV print on dibond, wood, hole in wall 96 x 96 x 7/8 inches | Courtesy of Letha Wilson

Installation view at Armory Show 2016 Joshua Tree Bronze Push series, 2016 Archival inkjet prints, bronze, museum plexiglas, wood frame Each approx 60” x 45” x 2 1/8” | Courtesy of Letha Wilson

Installation view at Armory Show 2016 Joshua Tree Bronze Push series, 2016 Archival inkjet prints, bronze, museum plexiglas, wood frame Each approx 60” x 45” x 2 1/8” | Courtesy of Letha Wilson

 

Madeline Hollander

Madeline Hollander, NYC resident and LA native, has always been fascinated by physical movement. At a young age, she was already finding ways to combine dance and invention. And her work captures just that. Through live choreographed performances and video installations – usually accompanied by music composed by her sister, Celia – Hollander reveals that there is beauty in simple day-to-day occurrences. Catch her latest exhibition, st, nd, rd, th, th, th…, at Socrates Sculpture Park – on now until March 12, 2017.

Mile | © of Madeline Hollander

Mile | Courtesy of Madeline Hollander

Socrates | © Madeline Hollander

Socrates | Courtesy of Madeline Hollander

You Are Here | © Madeline

You Are Here | Courtesy of Madeline Hollander

Illegal Motion | © Madeline Hollander

Illegal Motion | Courtesy of Madeline Hollander

Draft | © Madeline Hollander

Draft | Courtesy of Madeline Hollander

 

Jesse Mockrin

As a painter who got her start at the age of 15, it comes as a surprise that Jesse Mockrin averted from the medium while attending Barnard College in New York, where she focused on photography. But a nudge from artist Amy Adler – who she studied under while getting her MFA at University of California, San Diego – inspired Mockrin to revert back to the craft. Her work, deep and monumental, unveils a fantasy world of lush plant and floral life, soothing colors, and strangely polished faces, one most of us imagine only in our dreams. Whether it’s the eyes peering from behind delicately draped fabric, or the partially cropped images, her work suggests there’s something else to be seen. Represented by Night Gallery, Mockrin has had two solo exhibitions, with her latest showing in fall 2016.

© Jesse Mockrin

Courtesy of Jesse Mockrin

© Jesse Mockrin

Courtesy of Jesse Mockrin

© Jesse Mockrin

Courtesy of Jesse Mockrin

© Jesse Mockrin

Courtesy of Jesse Mockrin

© Jesse Mockrin

Courtesy of Jesse Mockrin

 

Tschabalala Self

Breaking cultural misconceptions about race and gender isn’t an easy feat. But Tschabalala Self has already made headway in rupturing those ideas engrained in our society. An African-American women born in Harlem, Self has an esteemed understanding of the kinds of fantasies about Blacks, especially Black women and their bodies, that exist in our modern society. Her work – which uses bold colors, abstract shapes, and pieces of fabric scraps – creates a sense of disorientation for the viewer, meant to challenge the typical response of defining characters by gender, race, or sexuality. Rather, she reveals that emotions and personal problems are universal, with each painting telling its own story.

© Tschabalala Self

Courtesy of Tschabalala Self

© Tschabalala Self

Courtesy of Tschabalala Self

© Tschabalala Self

Courtesy of Tschabalala Self

© Tschabalala Self

Courtesy of Tschabalala Self

© Tschabalala Self

Courtesy of Tschabalala Self

 

Heidi Hahn

Heidi Hahn‘s work doesn’t present women in their traditional tempestuous allure, a common theme in painting for centuries. Rather, she combats the stereotyped ideas about women and embraces their emotions. Her wax-like characters are clothed in humble, 70s-style attire, usually sitting, reclining, or lounging. But what’s changed is their expression: sadness, despair, empathy. These depictions create an intense reality that resonates across her paintings, all of which engage with the female body. She has had two solo exhibitions – Jack Hanley Gallery and Premier Regard in Paris – amongst several group exhibitions.

© Heidi Hahn

Courtesy of Heidi Hahn

© Heidi Hahn

Courtesy of Heidi Hahn

© Heidi Hahn

Courtesy of Heidi Hahn

© Heidi Hahn

Courtesy of Heidi Hahn

© Heidi Hahn

Courtesy of Heidi Hahn

© Heidi Hahn

Courtesy of Heidi Hahn

 

Willa Nasatir

In a world dominated by commercial photography, Willa Nasatir emerges as a breath of fresh air. Her photographs are usually tampered with via some sort of technical process – rephotographing, props, refracted light – or a physically damaging method, like burning or scratching off the surface. But what’s unique is her sense of depiction, which strays from the usual documentation present in contemporary photography. She captures what is most intangible, such as light, reflection, and shadow, allowing viewers to fill in the gaps with their own critical thought and imagery.

Willa Nasatir, installation view, Ghebaly Gallery, September 16 - October 29, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Willa Nasatir, installation view, Ghebaly Gallery, September 16 – October 29, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Willa Nasatir, installation view, Ghebaly Gallery, September 16 - October 29, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Willa Nasatir, installation view, Ghebaly Gallery, September 16 – October 29, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Willa Nasatir, installation view, Ghebaly Gallery, September 16 - October 29, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Willa Nasatir, installation view, Ghebaly Gallery, September 16 – October 29, 2016. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Willa Nasatir, White #1, 2016. C-print, tacks. 39 3/4 x 49 inches. Edition of 3 with 1 AP. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Willa Nasatir, White #1, 2016. C-print, tacks. 39 3/4 x 49 inches. Edition of 3 with 1 AP. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Willa Nasatir, Yellow #1, 2016. C-print, tacks. 39 3/4 x 49 inches. Edition of 3 with 1 AP. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

Willa Nasatir, Yellow #1, 2016. C-print, tacks. 39 3/4 x 49 inches. Edition of 3 with 1 AP. Courtesy the artist and Ghebaly Gallery, Los Angeles. Photo: Jeff McLane

 

Sophia Al-Maria

Sophia Al-Maria first rose to the scene as a writer, publishing her first book, The Girl Who Fell to Earth, in 2012. Her first solo exhibition in the US debuted in October 2016 at the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, where she used video and installations to project her ideas about contemporary life in the Gulf Arab nations. Raised in Washington State and Qatar, Al-Maria has spent her life witnessing the war between cultures, and how religion, the environment, and history affect the way we live today. She now lives and works in London, where she writes screenplays for a living.

Black Friday, 2016, and The Litany, 2016 by Sophia Al-Maria.  Installation view Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday (July 26-October 31, 2016).  Collection of the artist; courtesy Anna Lena Films, Paris and The Third Line, Dubai.  Whitney Museum of American Art; New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

Black Friday, 2016, and The Litany, 2016 by Sophia Al-Maria.  Installation view
Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday (July 26-October 31, 2016).  Collection of the artist;
courtesy Anna Lena Films, Paris and The Third Line, Dubai.  Whitney Museum of
American Art; New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

Black Friday, 2016, and The Litany, 2016 by Sophia Al-Maria.  Installation view Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday (July 26-October 31, 2016).  Collection of the artist; courtesy Anna Lena Films, Paris and The Third Line, Dubai.  Whitney Museum of American Art; New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

Black Friday, 2016, and The Litany, 2016 by Sophia Al-Maria.  Installation view
Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday (July 26-October 31, 2016).  Collection of the artist;
courtesy Anna Lena Films, Paris and The Third Line, Dubai.  Whitney Museum of
American Art; New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

Black Friday, 2016, and The Litany, 2016 by Sophia Al-Maria.  Installation view Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday (July 26-October 31, 2016).  Collection of the artist; courtesy Anna Lena Films, Paris and The Third Line, Dubai.  Whitney Museum of American Art; New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

Black Friday, 2016, and The Litany, 2016 by Sophia Al-Maria.  Installation view
Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday (July 26-October 31, 2016).  Collection of the artist;
courtesy Anna Lena Films, Paris and The Third Line, Dubai.  Whitney Museum of
American Art; New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

Black Friday, 2016, and The Litany, 2016 by Sophia Al-Maria.  Installation view Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday (July 26-October 31, 2016).  Collection of the artist; courtesy Anna Lena Films, Paris and The Third Line, Dubai.  Whitney Museum of American Art; New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz

Black Friday, 2016, and The Litany, 2016 by Sophia Al-Maria.  Installation view
Sophia Al-Maria: Black Friday (July 26-October 31, 2016).  Collection of the artist;
courtesy Anna Lena Films, Paris and The Third Line, Dubai.  Whitney Museum of
American Art; New York. Photo: Ron Amstutz