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The Proof wearable tells you exactly how drunk you are. | Courtesy Milo Sensors.
The Proof wearable tells you exactly how drunk you are. | Courtesy Milo Sensors.
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This Wristband Will Tell You When You’re Drunk

Picture of Peter Ward
Tech Editor
Updated: 7 January 2017
We’ve all woken up the morning after a night out drinking, and in hindsight decided maybe we shouldn’t have slammed that extra shot of tequila at 2am. Now you can – theoretically – make wiser choices when drinking, thanks to a new wearable device called Proof.

The wristband and sensor, unveiled at CES in Las Vegas, helps you track your alcohol intake in real time, and even tells you how long it will take for you to sober up.

Proof uses sensors to constantly monitor the amount of alcohol in your system. You can then use the app to see how drunk you are at that moment. That gives people the option to skip a round, grab a drink of water, or if they’re happy with their levels, order another shot.

So how does this work? When you drink, the alcohol molecules go into your blood stream. Most of those molecules come out of your body in your urine, but some also exit via your breath and your skin. Breathalyzers measure the number of alcohol molecules coming out of your breath, but Proof’s sensors instead track the tiny amount that escape through the skin.

The electro-chemical sensor converts the information to an electrical signal, and data is sent via Bluetooth to your phone, where the information is accessed.

The Proof device. And a beer. | Courtesy Milo Sensors.
The Proof device. And a beer. | Courtesy Milo Sensors.

Evan Strenk, CEO and Founder of Milo Sensors, the company behind Proof, said in an interview at CES in Las Vegas that the device takes away the awkwardness of checking your blood alcohol levels. “It takes the social stigma out of things, if you’re on the opposite side of the table from me and I bring up my phone, you don’t know if I’m tracking blood alcohol or texting someone.”

Users are also able to set up alarms, which will notify them when their alcohol levels reach a certain point. The company is also introducing a buddy system. “We call it safety buddies. People can track their friends or loved ones while they’re having a great night out and make sure they’re having a good night out and also maybe make it a little safe, and pick them up if they need to,” Strenk said.