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Kit Harington as Jon Snow | © HBO
Kit Harington as Jon Snow | © HBO
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'Game of Thrones' Script Leaked After HBO Hack

Picture of Peter Ward
Tech Editor
Updated: 29 May 2018
HBO beware, the internet is dark and full of hackers. The TV network suffered a major cyber attack recently, and the hackers managed to steal 1.5 terabytes of data, including the script for the next episode of Game of Thrones.

The hackers have reportedly posted the script for episode four of Game of Thrones season 7, and are claiming more leaks are coming soon.

“HBO recently experienced a cyber incident, which resulted in the compromise of proprietary information,” the network confirmed in a statement to Entertainment Weekly. “We immediately began investigating the incident and are working with law enforcement and outside cybersecurity firms. Data protection is a top priority at HBO, and we take seriously our responsibility to protect the data we hold.”

An anonymous email sent to reporters earlier this week said: “Hi to all mankind. The greatest leak of cyber space era is happening. What’s its name? Oh I forget to tell. Its HBO and Game of Thrones……!!!!!! You are lucky to be the first pioneers to witness and download the leak. Enjoy it & spread the words. Whoever spreads well, we will have an interview with him. HBO is falling.”

HBO didn’t reveal what data the hackers had stolen exactly, meaning they could even possess whole episodes of the show. In April, a hacker stole and released episodes from season 5 of Orange Is the New Black, ahead of its release this summer. The biggest cyber attack to hit the entertainment industry remains the Sony hack in 2014, when 100 terabytes of data was stolen and uploaded online.

This isn’t the first time that Game of Thrones content has been leaked online. In season 5 the first four episodes found their way online, after review DVDs were sent to press and industry insiders. HBO has since abandoned the practice of handing out previews.