A Guide to Alaskan Oysters

Alaskan oysters are completely unique
Alaskan oysters are completely unique | © Bailey Berg
Photo of Bailey Berg
1 May 2018
View

Alaska has long been heralded as one of the top places to go for seafood, thanks to the abundance of salmon, halibut, and crab. Now, due to legislation passed in the late 1980s, oysters are harvested here, as well, and they, too, are becoming an unmissable Alaskan treat. Here are a few things to know about what makes Alaskan oysters so unique.

They don’t grow in Alaska naturally

The waters off the Alaskan coast are just warm enough (and full of more than enough plankton) for the oysters to thrive once in the water, but it’s too cold for them to reproduce. For decades, the oyster “seeds” were flown in from the West Coast and transplanted. However, in recent years, the Kachemak Bay Oyster Co-Op has figured out how to have the oysters procreate in their Homer lab, where the offspring then remain until they’re ready to be moved to Halibut Cove and other nearby waters to finish their lifecycle.

Alaskan oysters are unique and don’t naturally grow in the cold waters around the state | © Bailey Berg

They don’t get spawny

Many Americans follow the adage that you shouldn’t eat oysters in months that don’t have an “r” (May, June, July, August). Because the waters of the Kachemak Bay don’t usually get hotter than 50°F (10°C), the bivalves don’t reach sexual maturation. This makes it harder for oyster farmers to maintain a constant crop, but it’s to the diners’ benefit: the oysters stay crisp and fresh, even in summer months, when elsewhere they’re getting soft and milky.

They’re cleaner

Alaskan oysters aren’t grown on the seafloor, as the state doesn’t allow for beaches to be used for private enterprise. So, unlike oysters grown in oyster beds, Alaskan oysters are coddled in tiered nets that are suspended from buoys, which means sand and other particles don’t penetrate the oysters with the changing of the tide. This also means they’ll never grow pearls.

An oyster farmer sorts oysters for selling | ©Bailey Berg

They’re more uniformly shaped

Those tiered nets they grow in also allow the oysters be gently tossed, which gives them deep cups of plump meat, as opposed to long and shallow shells.

They’re constantly monitored

Oyster farming in a state where oysters don’t naturally grow is no easy task. The nets need to be pulled up and checked several times a year to remove dead loss and to blast off the seaweed with a hose. Predators, such as starfish, enjoy nibbling on the bivalves, so they are also pulled out during the checks. By the time the oysters make their way to diners, they’ve been given oodles of TLC.

An oyster farmer cleans the nets | © Bailey Berg

Since you are here, we would like to share our vision for the future of travel – and the direction Culture Trip is moving in.

Culture Trip launched in 2011 with a simple yet passionate mission: to inspire people to go beyond their boundaries and experience what makes a place, its people and its culture special and meaningful — and this is still in our DNA today. We are proud that, for more than a decade, millions like you have trusted our award-winning recommendations by people who deeply understand what makes certain places and communities so special.

Increasingly we believe the world needs more meaningful, real-life connections between curious travellers keen to explore the world in a more responsible way. That is why we have intensively curated a collection of premium small-group trips as an invitation to meet and connect with new, like-minded people for once-in-a-lifetime experiences in three categories: Epic Trips, Mini Trips and Sailing Trips. Our Trips are suitable for both solo travellers and friends who want to explore the world together.

Epic Trips are deeply immersive 8 to 16 days itineraries, that combine authentic local experiences, exciting activities and enough down time to really relax and soak it all in. Our Mini Trips are small and mighty - they squeeze all the excitement and authenticity of our longer Epic Trips into a manageable 3-5 day window. Our Sailing Trips invite you to spend a week experiencing the best of the sea and land in the Caribbean and the Mediterranean.

We know that many of you worry about the environmental impact of travel and are looking for ways of expanding horizons in ways that do minimal harm – and may even bring benefits. We are committed to go as far as possible in curating our trips with care for the planet. That is why all of our trips are flightless in destination, fully carbon offset - and we have ambitious plans to be net zero in the very near future.

Cookies Policy

We and our partners use cookies to better understand your needs, improve performance and provide you with personalised content and advertisements. To allow us to provide a better and more tailored experience please click "OK"