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What They’re Reading In Mexico In Autumn 2016
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What They’re Reading In Mexico In Autumn 2016

Picture of Lauren Cocking
Northern England Writer
Updated: 19 September 2016
Mexico is not a country known for having good reading habits; in fact, it was ranked 107th out of 108 countries by a UNESCO-led reading habit assessment a few years ago. Although the number of children attending school is higher than ever, the number of those who read books for pleasure is falling. Having said that, a significant portion of the country still indulges in the pastime, and here we single out ten books that literature-inclined Mexicans are sure to be reading in autumn 2016.
© Salamandra
© Salamandra

Harry Potter y el legado maldito by J.K. Rowling, Jack Thorne, and John Tiffany

While the English-language version of this pretty-much-guaranteed bestseller is already out, the Spanish-language version is only available for pre-order at the time of writing. It’s a given that this will be one of the hot books in Mexico for autumn 2016 when it’s finally released on September 28th; following the story of Harry et al. into adulthood, the book focuses principally on Harry and his son, Albus.

© Turtleback
© Turtleback

Yo antes de ti & Después de ti by Jojo Moyes

These two romantic novels by Jojo Moyes make our list because of the huge success the film adaptation of Yo antes de ti has experienced. As a result, Yo antes de ti (originally published in 2012) continues to be one of the country’s top-selling titles in both bookstores and online. As is to be expected, the 2015 sequel (Después de ti) has been proving equally popular, and its success seems likely to continue throughout autumn 2016.

© Random House
© Random House

Huracán by Sofía Segovia

The first entry by a Mexican author comes from Monterrey-native Sofía Segovia with her novel Huracán, an updated second-edition release of Noche del huracán (2010). Given that she’ll be presenting this latest version at Gandhi in Mexico City this September, it’s to be expected that it will be a bestseller this autumn. Focusing on a protagonist whose life seems marked by disaster, it explores human suffering in an uncaring, prejudiced, and egocentric world.

© Grijalbo
© Grijalbo

Los herederos de la tierra by Ildefonso Falcones

Fans of Spanish author Ildefonso Falcones have had to endure a ten-year wait for this follow-up to his bestselling La catedral del mar, and so it is unsurprising that this is already one of the most popular books in Mexican bookstores. Released at the end of August, Los herederos de la tierra returns to Barcelona to pick up the story three years later.

© Almadia
© Almadia

Deche bitoope. El dorso del cangrejo by Natalia Toledo

If you haven’t heard of bilingual Spanish-Zapotec poet Natalia Toledo, you’ve almost certainly heard of either her father, famed artist Francisco Toledo, or her tattooist brother, Dr. Lakra. Widely acknowledged as helping to revive public interest in the Zapotec language, Toledo’s Deche biotope. El dorso del cangrejo is a bilingual anthology which features illustrations from her brother and a focus on her hometown and its women.

© Planeta
© Planeta

El inesperado plan de la escritora sin nombre by Alice Basso

The eponymous ‘writer without name’ in this debut novel by Italian-born Alice Basso is the ghostwriter protagonist, Silvana. El inesperado plan de la escritora sin nombre follows Silvana as she meets Riccardo and subsequently has her life turned upside down by the events that follow, which ultimately lead to her becoming a key figure in a criminal investigation. An homage to literature and the art of novel writing, this is a work to watch out for in autumn 2016.

© Espasa
© Espasa

Uno siempre cambia al amor de su vida (por otro amor o por otra vida) by Amalia Andrade Arango

A so-called interactive first aid kit for the broken-hearted, this debut title by the pleasingly named Amalia Andrade Arango is a self-help book free of the cheesiness that too often characterizes the genre. Filled with advice, lists, and a ton of ideas to turn any bad situation into a liberating one, the book even includes recipes between its gorgeously understated covers.

© Uranito
© Uranito

Los cuentos negros de Ofelia by Jorge A. Estrada

This title will be the subject of an exposition at the popular bookstore El Péndulo in September, so it will likely be one to watch in Mexico in autumn. Although it was released in April of this year, the book is still generating much buzz in the literary world. It tells the tale of Ofelia, a young girl so enamored with horror stories that she begins to write her own.

© Alfaguara
© Alfaguara

Tus dos muertos by Jorge Alberto Gudiño

A mystery novel in which the protagonist is forced to confront his past while investigating the disappearance of a young boy, Tus dos muertos has been praised for representing a new stage in prolific author and Mexico City native Jorge Alberto Gudiño‘s career, one that’s darker and in many respects more accomplished.

© Planeta
© Planeta

La danza de mi muerte by Sandra Frid

The final book that we predict Mexico will be reading this autumn is Mexican Sandra Frid’s first-person narrative novel La danza de la muerte, which will be part of an El Péndulo presentation later this month. The book concerns the life of Nellie Campobello, a famed dancer and writer who opined on the Mexican Revolution, and whose life was arguably stranger than fiction: she mysteriously disappeared at the age of 84 and died at age 86.