The Top 10 Things to See and Do in Tequila, Mexicoairport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar

The Top 10 Things to See and Do in Tequila, Mexico

The streets of Tequila
The streets of Tequila | © Gabriel Saldana / Flickr
Famed as the birthplace of Mexico’s national drink, the town of Tequila has recently enjoyed an explosion of tourism as visitors come to explore its historic distilleries and cantinas. Just an hour from Guadalajara, the town was declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 2006. It boasts a distinctive, rustic atmosphere and is surrounded by hills lined with countless rows of spiky blue agave plants. But make sure to read through this list before you make the trip – here are the top ten things to see and do in this iconic Mexican town.

Jose Cuervo Express

Distillery
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José Cuervo barrels
José Cuervo barrels | © zkropotkine / Flickr
The train tour offered by Jose Cuervo is undoubtedly one of the best ways to visit Tequila. The mock-19th-century railcar departs at 9 a.m. or 9.30 a.m. from Guadalajara’s Ferromex station and involves a tour of Jose Cuervo’s La Rojeña Distillery, a trip to the agave fields and various samplings of tequila.
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La Rojeña Distillery

Distillery
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Jose Cuervo cellar collection
Jose Cuervo cellar collection | © Thomassin Mickaël / Flickr
For visitors who are not taking the train, it is still possible to take a tour of Jose Cuervo’s elegant distillery, which is the oldest in Latin America. Head to the distillery’s reception to arrange your 90-minute guided tour. Visitors are taken through the entire production process, from the brick ovens where the agave is cooked, to the oak barrels that are stacked in its aging cellar. The tour culminates with a tasting of Jose Cuervo’s premium tequila, Reserva de la Familia.
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Plaza Principal de Tequila

Theater
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Papantla Flyers
Papantla Flyers | © Larry Lamsa / Flickr
Voladores, or “flying” dancers, mostly originate from the state of Puebla, where the ritual was born. However, they are also a regular fixture in Tequila and often perform their ritual dance in the Plaza Principal (main square). The performers spin around a tall wooden pole from which they are attached by their ankles. The ceremony has even been recognized as an Intangible Cultural Heritage by UNESCO.
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The Museo Nacional del Tequila

Museum
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Museo Nacional del Tequila
Museo Nacional del Tequila | © Thomassin Mickaël / Flickr
For more insights into the history and culture behind Mexico’s national spirit, head over to the Museo Nacional del Tequila (National Museum of Tequila). Inaugurated in 2000, the museum offers five rooms with themed exhibits and artwork related to tequila and its production.
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Municipio de Tequila

Museum
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Municipio de Tequila
Municipio de Tequila | © DRVMX / Flickr
Make sure to stop in at the Municipio de Tequila (Town Hall) in Tequila, which is on the south side of the main plaza. Recently remodeled, the building boasts a striking mural painted by the artist Manuel Hernández. The monumental artwork highlights the significance of the agave plant in pre-colonial Mexico and contains the female Aztec deity Mayahuel, who is associated with fertility and nourishment.
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La Cata

Bar, Mexican, $$$
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top shelf tequila
Tequila bottles | © Steven Guzzardi / Flickr
A little over a year old, La Cata is a haven for those who fancy themselves tequila connoisseurs and anyone who is considering becoming one. Their tequila tasting room includes a wide variety of some of the highest quality Mexican spirits. The staff know their tequila and are also very friendly, so don’t hesitate to ask questions or for recommendations.
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La Capilla

Bar, Mexican, $$$
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If you still have the energy, head over to La Capilla, “The Chapel,” for a nightcap. The oldest cantina in Tequila, La Capilla was given that name because patrons walk in on their feet but crawl out on their knees. Inside, the bar has rough tiled floors, spindly stools and a very lively, friendly atmosphere.
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El Guero bar

Bar, Mexican, $$$
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Cantaritos of tequila
Cantaritos of tequila | © Gabriel Saldana / Flickr
After breakfast, head over to the nearby village of Amatitán, 15 minutes’ drive from Tequila. El Guero bar is a legendary institution in Tequila country. The open-air bar offers cheerful cantaritos, or clay pots, to its very contented clientele. These are filled with a potent cocktail of tequila, lime, salt and fruit juices.
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