The Most Beautiful Destinations to Visit in Oaxaca, Mexico

Sleepy Pacific beaches dot the coastline of Oaxaca, attracting visitors from across the world
Sleepy Pacific beaches dot the coastline of Oaxaca, attracting visitors from across the world | © Roger Cracknell 01 / classic / Alamy Stock Photo
Photo of Kylie Madry
8 October 2021

Oaxaca state is a hotbed of culture, from ancient indigenous ruins to beach yoga opportunities and (arguably) the best chocolate in the world. Whether you want to surf waves, spot dolphins or browse the best arts and crafts in Mexico, you can do it in Oaxaca.

Stretching from the mountains to the sea, the state of Oaxaca in the south of Mexico is celebrated as a bedrock of indigenous culture as well as the arts and crafts capital of Mexico. Then there are the rock formations at Hierve el Agua, the untouched sandy beaches in Zipolite and the pre-Hispanic ruins at Yagul.

Oaxaca City

Architectural Landmark
Map View
Santo Domingo de Guzman Church in Oaxaca, Mexico
© Prakich Treetasayuth / Alamy

A trip to Oaxaca wouldn’t be complete without a stopover in its capital city. If you’re flying in, you’ll likely land in Oaxaca City anyway, so it makes sense to make the most of it straight away. Oaxaca’s zócalo (main square) is right in the middle of downtown. Stalls and street vendors pack out the plaza – make sure you try Oaxacan chocolate, arguably the most important export from the area – and the 16th-century Metropolitan Cathedral towers overhead. Nearby, in the colonial center, artisan markets, museums and regional meals await.

Puerto Escondido

Natural Feature
Map View
Playa Carrizalillo, Puerto Escondido, Oaxaca, Mexico, North America
© robertharding / Alamy Stock Photo

Surfers flock to Puerto Escondido for sun, sand and some of the best waves in Mexico. The town has a reputation for being laid-back and you won’t find mega-resorts like those in Cancún or Puerto Vallarta here. Even if you’re not there to hang ten, you’ll still want to get in the water. Head to the Manialtepec Lagoon, just 20 minutes outside of town, which is one of the few places where you can swim with glow-in-the-dark, bioluminescent plankton that light up the lake.

Monte Albán

Archaeological site, Ruins
Map View
Monte Alban, a pre-Columbian archaeological site, The west side platform, Oaxaca, Mexico
© Bjanka Kadic / Alamy
High above Oaxaca City sit the ruins of another city, Monte Albán. These ruins, some of the most-visited in Mexico, were home to a pre-Hispanic metropolis founded by the indigenous Zapotecs, then later inhabited by Mixtec groups. You can see what remains of the Zapotec capital, including terraces, tombs and underground tunnels stretching for miles. If you climb to the top of one of the site’s pyramids, you’ll get a stunning view of Oaxaca City down below.

Mazunte

Architectural Landmark
Map View

Down the Pacific Coast, sleepy surf towns dot the shore. One of these is Mazunte, a pueblo mágico (meaning it has special status from the tourism board) known for its black-sand, volcanic beach, Playa Mermejita. Yoga teachers offer classes year-round on the beach and, depending on the season, you may be able to spot dolphins, whales or tortoises breaking the water from a tour starting at Playa Mazunte.

Zipolite

Architectural Landmark
Map View

Right down the coast from Mazunte, Zipolite is another hidden-away, laid-back village, but with a slightly more risqué reputation. Zipolite’s Playa del Amor, on the edge of town, has long been a popular, clothing-optional beach, where it’s not uncommon to see swimmers baring all in the water. Now, attitudes at the town’s main beach, Playa Zipolite, are also relaxing, thanks to a nearby nudist hotel and the beach’s annual nudist gathering.

Hierve el Agua

Spa, Natural Feature
Map View
Hierve el Agua, natural rock formations in the Mexican state of Oaxaca
© Konstantin Kalishko / Alamy

You won’t find hot springs at Hierve el Agua – which literally translates as “the water boils” – but you can swim in the small mineral-heavy waters, said to have healing powers, at the top of the tall rock formation. Mineral buildup over the years has created the illusion of two white-rock waterfalls down the cliff. While this is a trip worth making, double-check that it’s open before you go, as the site is often closed due to disputes between the state and nearby communities.

Bahías de Huatulco

Natural Feature
Map View

Even further down the coast from Puerto Escondido and Mazunte, the nine bahías (bays) of Huatulco are a set of off-map beaches that have just been uncovered from the surrounding thick forest in the past few decades. One – the bay of Cacaluta – even stood in for the fictional Heaven’s Mouth beach in Alfonso Cuarón’s 2001 film Y Tu Mamá También. The waves at Bahías de Huatulco are less intense than in Puerto Escondido, so if you’re new to surfing, this might be the place to pick up a board.

Mitla

Architectural Landmark
Map View

To the southeast of Oaxaca City, Mitla once held an important role for the Zapotec people. While Monte Albán was the political powerhouse, Mitla (translating to “place of the dead”) served a religious role as a sacred burial site. Here, you’ll find intricately carved stonework unlike anything else in Mesoamerica, along with the Church of San Pablo, which the raiding Spanish placed on top of the conquered city.

Yagul

Natural Feature
Map View
a labyrinthine structure forming an intricate complex of passageways and many rooms at the ruins of Yagul Oaxaca Mexico
© Barna Tanko / Alamy

Down the road from Mitla, Yagul was an ancient Zapotec city-state occupied as early as 500 BCE, although cliff paintings in the area date back to at least 3,000 BCE. You can get a sense of ancient Zapotec life by exploring the site’s three areas: a fortress formed from volcanic rock, the ceremonial center and the residential living quarters on the outskirts of the ruins. There’s even a labyrinthine palace, hidden tombs and the second-biggest ancient playing field in all of Mesoamerica on the grounds.

Punta Cometa Lookout Point

Natural Feature
Map View
Stunning view of sacred hill and  blue ocean in Punta Cometa, Mexico
© Garrett Andrew Chong / Alamy

It’s worth stopping in Mazunte just for the incredible vistas from this viewpoint. It’s the best vantage point in the village, And we recommend arriving at dusk to see the sun sink across the horizon in streams of yellows, oranges and purples. Or, if you’re an early riser, do the opposite: watch the sun creep up from the east, then go for a swim on Mazunte Beach before it gets too hot.

These recommendations were updated on October 8, 2021 to keep your travel plans fresh. This article is an updated version of a story created by Kylie Madry

Cookies Policy

We and our partners use cookies to better understand your needs, improve performance and provide you with personalised content and advertisements. To allow us to provide a better and more tailored experience please click "OK"