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Oaxaca is great for walking
Oaxaca is great for walking | © Esmée Winnubst/ Flickr
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The Best Walking Tours in Mexico

Picture of Lauren Cocking
Mexico Writer
Updated: 29 March 2018
Getting to know Mexico, a diverse country too big to fully explore in one go, can be tricky. However, once you’re in a town or city of your choice, there’s one no-brainer way that you can take in the key sights, smells and sounds of the place —by taking part in a walking tour. Here are the best walking tours in Mexico, from the capital to the coast and most places in between.

Street Art Chilango, Mexico City

Street art fans will be blown away by the urban murals on display in Mexico City, period. However, for those who find it a bit overwhelming to hunt down these enormous works of art alone, there’s the Street Art Chilango walking tour. This well put-together walking tour takes participants around some of the city’s most famed pieces of art and will help you get your bearings in Mexico’s concrete jungle capital too.

Mexico City is one of the best street art destinations in the world
Mexico City is one of the best street art destinations in the world | © Jules Antonio/ Flickr

Go! Running Tour, Mexico City

Our second Mexico City walking tour option adds an unusual twist to the typical ‘follow the guide at a measured pace’ format, because it’s actually a running tour. With Go! Running Tours, experienced (and incredibly in shape) guides will take fitness fanatics on a brisk jog around many of the main sights. However, don’t forget to acclimatise before signing up to this running tour, as the Ciudad de Mexico sits at a cool 2,250m above sea level.

Mexico City is easily explored on foot
Mexico City is easily explored on foot | © Lui_piquee/ Flickr

Pink Cactus Free Walking Tour, Merida

We move over to the Yucatan peninsula for this leisurely walking tour in hot and humid Merida. The pleasantly named Pink Cactus Free Walking Tour ferries participants around the principal architectural sights of the city, recounting local myths and legends along the way. And the two-hour English-language tour is entirely for free, but do tip generously if your guide did a good job.

Mérida is a vibrant city
Mérida is a vibrant city | © Graeme Churchard/ Flickr

Free Tour Guadalajara, Guadalajara

Another free tour can be found in Guadalajara, Mexico City’s little brother and the country’s second biggest city overall. Despite its size and sprawling Metropolitan Zone though, most of the coolest and best attractions in Guadalajara can be enjoyed on foot and in the centre, making taking part in the Free Tour Guadalajara easily one of the best ways to soak it all in.

Guadalajara is a criminally underrated city
Guadalajara is a criminally underrated city | © Matthew Rutledge/ Flickr

Tours de Jour, Puerto Vallarta

If you’re looking for a great walking tour of tourist favourite Puerto Vallarta, then make a beeline for Tours de Jour. Ranked incredibly highly amongst those who’ve participated, Tours de Jour walking tours aren’t free, but they will help you power walk your way around the hidden gems available in the well-trodden, uber-typical Vallarta downtown area and beyond.

Puerto Vallarta’s walkable malecón
Puerto Vallarta’s walkable malecón | © Andrew Milligan Sumo/ Flickr

Vallarta Eats Food Tour, Puerto Vallarta

Mexico is home to numerous well-curated and delicious street food tours, from vegan versions in Mexico City to those focused on traditional treats in Puebla; however, coastal Vallarta is also home to one of the country’s best food/taco tours—Vallarta Eats Food Tour. Headed up by local, bilingual guides, these tasty tours are worth every penny and all that walking might help you burn off what you wolf down!

What walking tour isn’t improved with food?
What walking tour isn’t improved with food? | © Scott Dexter/ Flickr

Tijuana Walking Tour, Tijuana

Another city, another food tour, this time in Tijuana. While some still associate this northern border town with crime, those in the know realise that Tijuana is actually a great place for typical Mexican cuisine with a touch of Tex-Mex influence. One of the best ways to get acquainted with all that Tijuana has to offer then, is by taking the Tijuana Walking Tour Wednesday thru Friday.

Where Mexico meets the US
Where Mexico meets the US | © Romel Jacinto/ Flickr

Gallery District Art Walk, San José del Cabo

San Jose del Cabo’s Gallery District Art Walk provides insight into the artsy side of this popular Baja California destinations, introducing participants to sculptures, fine art and some of the city’s best restaurants every Thursday night, between November and June. Already taken this walking tour? Take it again! The galleries and installations are forever changing, making this a perfectly perennial option.

Sunny San José del Cabo
Sunny San José del Cabo | © PriceTravel pictures/ Flickr

Journeys Beyond the Surface, Oaxaca

Consistently considered one of the best walking tours in Oaxaca, Journeys Beyond the Surface is a tiny tour company offering insight into an eclectic few locations (it also runs walking tours in both Iran and Mexico City). In Oaxaca however, you can either be shepherded to nearby villages, take a stroll through the centre or even have a go at cooking some typical cuisine.

Oaxaca is great for walking
Oaxaca is great for walking | © Esmée Winnubst/ Flickr

Puebla de Ensueño, Puebla

Finally, if your destination is the colonial city of Puebla, just south of Mexico City, make sure to book a tour through Puebla de Ensueño. They offer all kinds of walking options, from those that delve deep into the city’s pre-Hispanic past to those which dabble in mole making and modernity. The tour guide also has several years of experience and professional accreditation.

Puebla, Mexico: Home of beautiful doorways
Puebla, Mexico: Home of beautiful doorways | © Alejandro/ Flickr