A Solo Traveler’s Guide To Tel Avivairport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar

A Solo Traveler’s Guide To Tel Aviv

© Kapilkumar Ingle
© Kapilkumar Ingle
Alone in Tel Aviv? No problem. The city is happy to host you, even when you are traveling alone and unfamiliar with its unique culture. Become familiar with city’s culture and mentality more closely and enjoy the freedom of traveling with Culture Trip’s guide.
Statues of Tel Aviv © Xiquinho Silva / Flickr

Apps

As a solo traveler you should come with a smartphone, equipped with the latest apps and maps of Tel Aviv and Israel. There are many apps to download that will help you make sense of the city. Particularly popular are Moovit, which help you navigate public transport, and Waze, an app which helps you navigate the busy traffic system.

Accommodation

Visiting Tel Aviv is relatively expensive, but by following a budget it becomes quite easy to live and enjoy the energy and passion of the city. There are a range of hotels available, for a variety of budgets and styles. For solo travelers, the small boutique hotels close to cafés and restaurants are the best bet. If you have a long visit planned, rental apartments are a better and more budget-friendly option.

Get Familiar with the Culture

Although Israel is located in the Middle East geographically, its culture is fairly Westernized. Tel Aviv has a unique combination of both modern and traditional culture. Hebrew is the national language of Israel, though the majority of the people are also extremely competent in English, specifically in the cosmopolitan city of Tel Aviv. As a solo traveler, however, it’s best to learn some basic sentences and proverbs in Hebrew, in addition to a few life hacks.

Roses in Yarkon Park © Kapilkumar Ingle Flickr

Plan Your Trip

It’s best to arrive in the city with plans to save time. There are parks, beaches, restaurants, cafés, and bars, which are all perfect gateways. Tel Aviv has several Shuks to explore, in addition to local food, beer, wine, and coffee. Another new trend is taking part in food tours around the city. Why not nibble through the neighborhood with a vegan tour by TLVEG, or learn some Hebrew while getting to know the city with Streetwise Hebrew.

Night view after raining © Eyal Teutsch / Flickr