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By Cyril Sauliner | Unsplash
By Cyril Sauliner | Unsplash
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Workout Before Your Flight, at Heathrow's Airport Fitness Studio

Picture of Esme Benjamin
Wellness Editor
Updated: 7 July 2017
After you’ve exhausted the duty free, bought every magazine in the terminal, and had more alcohol than is advisable before a long haul flight, there’s not a lot to do at the airport besides sit and watch the clock. But that could be about to change, because London’s Heathrow is set to open a wellness and fitness studio—the first of its kind.

While many airports have dedicated rooms for yoga, Heathrow’s Terminal 2 will be the first to offer instructor-led cardio, strength and yoga classes. “The new premium service from FlyFit brings personalized exercise choices into our customer’s journey, leaving them refreshed and ready for their onward travel,” said Chris Annetts, Heathrow’s retail and service proposition director.

The wellness space will be run by fitness newcomer FlyFit, whose founders Lauren Perkins and Brian Chappon—entrepreneurs and athletes—launched the venture in a bid to make long haul travel more healthy.

FlyFit will provide workout clothing to rent and showers to freshen up post-class, as well as nutritious food options. If the studio proves popular with Terminal 2’s 16 million annual passengers, FlyFit is hoping to expand its offerings, helping people spend their layovers more productively, wherever in the world they happen to be.

By Aral Tasher
By Aral Tasher | Unsplash

It seems as if the airline industry as a whole is gradually becoming more health and wellness savvy. Earlier this year Qantas announced a partnership with The University of Sydney, introducing new health initiatives on long haul flights in an attempt to make passengers more comfortable and reduce the effects of jet lag.

Potentially these improvements could help reduce medical emergencies in the air—like so-called “economy syndrome,” when blood clots form in the legs due to long periods of immobility—as well as helping travelers enjoy more of their vacation time without feeling exhausted, tight and bloated.