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Jakob Fenger, Bjørnstjerne Christiansen and Rasmus Nielsen | Photo: © Tate
Jakob Fenger, Bjørnstjerne Christiansen and Rasmus Nielsen | Photo: © Tate
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Tate Modern's Vast Turbine Hall is Transformed by Danish Collective, SUPERFLEX

Picture of Freire Barnes
Art & Design Editor
Updated: 26 October 2017
The playfully subversive Danish collective SUPERFLEX take on the third Hyundai Commission to transform Tate Modern‘s enormous Turbine Hall.

They’ve flooded a life-size replica of a McDonald’s, copied the renowned female artist Barbara Kruger and created a biogas system for rural communities, and now Bjørnstjerne Christiansen, Jakob Fenger and Rasmus Nielsen of SUPERFLEX have been let loose on one of the world’s largest exhibition spaces.

Superflex
One Two Three Swing! installation views | Photo: © Tate

‘Their work raises timely questions about the role of the artist in contemporary society, exploring how we interpret and engage with the increasingly complex world around us,’ said Frances Morris, the new Director of Tate Modern on the announcement of SUPERFLEX taking on the renowned site-specific commission.

Since 2000, when Tate Modern opened, the Turbine Hall has showcased some of the most monumental, engaging, ground-breaking – quite literally when Cuban artist Doris Salcedo put a giant crack the length of the hall – dynamic and exciting site-specific artworks by leading international artists. Now SUPERFLEX follow in the footsteps of Louise Bourgeois, Ai Weiwei, Anish Kapoor and Carsten Höller to create a unique new work that will be experienced by millions of Tate Modern visitors.

Superflex, Still from the film 'Flooded Macdonalds', 2008 | Courtesy of SUPERFLEX
Still from the film ‘Flooded McDonald’s’, 2008 | Courtesy of SUPERFLEX

Founded in 1993, the three artists have been creating subversive and humorous works that ‘engage alternative models for the creation, dissemination, and maintenance of social and economic organisation.’ For their major public park project, Superkilen, they collaborated with the local residents to create ‘a unifying urban space with a distinct international identity.’

Superflex, Superkilen, The Black Market
, 2011 | Photo: Iwan Baan
Superflex, Superkilen, The Black Market 2011 | Photo: Iwan Baan

Working in various media, SUPERFLEX challenge both the expectations of art and the exhibition space, so the Copenhagen-based trio have tackled the 3,300 m² (35,520 sq ft) space by filling it with swings and a surprisingly meditative carpeted area, where you can lie and be almost hypnotised by the giant pendulum.

Superflex
One Two Three Swing! installation view | Photo: © Tate
Superflex
One Two Three Swing! installation views | Photo: © Tate

Hyundai Commission: Superflex One Two Three Swing! is on until April 2, 2018.

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