London's Hauntingly Beautiful Highgate Cemetery in 12 Photosairport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar

London's Hauntingly Beautiful Highgate Cemetery in 12 Photos

Explore the gravestones in Highgate cemetery
Explore the gravestones in Highgate cemetery | © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip
North London’s Highgate cemetery has approximately 170,000 people buried there, with around 53,000 graves and 300 war graves. The famous place of burial is one of London’s Magnificent Seven – the name given to the largest cemeteries in the city. Here are 12 photos that demonstrate London’s hauntingly beautiful Highgate cemetery.
Highgate cemetery © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip

During the Victorian Era, Highgate became a fashionable place for burials especially with it being located on a hill, above the smoke of the city. The century’s attitudes to death and presentation led to a rise of gothic tombs and buildings in the London cemetery.

Explore the gravestones in Highgate cemetery © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip
Martina O'Shea / © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip
Highgate cemetery © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip
© Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip 

The North London cemetery is divided into two parts: East and West, and has many famous names resting within the grounds. Philosopher Karl Marx and literary legend George Eliot are buried in the cemetery’s East section. More recently, singer George Michael is also buried there, but his grave is a private plot, inaccessible to the general public.

Other notable people laid to rest within the grounds include the author of The Hitchhiker’s Guide To The Galaxy Douglas Adams, Charles Dickens’s wife Catherine Dickens, and founder of the world’s largest dog show, Charles Cruft.

Karl Marx's memorial in Highgate cemetery © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip
Highgate cemetery © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip

The famous resting ground is well-known for its greenery. Today, the cemetery grounds are filled with trees, wildflowers and shrubs, which in turn attracts a whole host of interesting wildlife; particularly birds and foxes. The cemetery features an Egyptian Avenue and a Circle of Lebanon which showcases winding paths leading to tombs and vaults dug into the hillside.

Victorian gravestones in Highgate cemetery © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip
A cat in Highgate cemetery © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip
Visitors in Highgate cemetery © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip
Victorian angels in Highgate cemetery © Martina O'Shea / Culture Trip

While Highgate cemetery is open to the public, the oldest section only allows admission for tour groups, to protect the ground’s collections of Victorian mausoleums and intricately carved graves. To find out more and book a tour, visit highgatecemetery.org/visit.