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© Len Trievnor/Express/Getty Images
© Len Trievnor/Express/Getty Images
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Getty Images Gallery Presents Glorious 'Visions of Sport 2017' Exhibition

Picture of Luke Bradshaw
Sports Editor
Updated: 11 June 2017
The Getty Images Gallery, situated in London’s Oxford Circus, is presenting a beautiful exhibition that showcases the finest photography from the sporting world; Visions of Sport 2017.

The exhibition presents the work of 65 award-winning photographers, as well as a particular selection of pictures from the Getty Images Archive, one of, if not the, best sources of sports photography in the world.

Tom Brady of the New England Patriots drops back to pass against the Dallas Cowboys in Arlington, Texas | © Christian Petersen/Getty Images
Tom Brady of the New England Patriots drops back to pass against the Dallas Cowboys in Arlington, Texas | © Christian Petersen/Getty Images

Shawn Waldron, the curator at Getty Images Gallery, said, ‘This is an exciting exhibit for our Gallery clients and the general public. In making our choices for Visions of Sport 2017 we focused on strong photographs that transcended individual athletes in favour of more universal themes such as daring and tenacity. The exhibit will appeal to both sports fans and photography aficionados.’

Getty Images Gallery manager Amie Lewis added, ‘A key feature of Visions of Sport 2017 is the first person narrative provided by the photographers. Their descriptions of the action and behind the scenes details are riveting.’

James Hunt at the wheel of his car at Silverstone | © Victor Blackman/Express/Getty Images
James Hunt at the wheel of his car at Silverstone | © Victor Blackman/Express/Getty Images

The exhibition was put together by Waldron, Lewis and Director of Photography Paul Gilham. The 65 photographer’s on Getty’s books were all asked to submit three photos each, with three being selected by the panel, along with the chosen archive images. The variety of sports, and personalities within those sports, is spectacular. From legends such as Muhammad Ali and James Hunt, to children playing games in their simplest and purest form.

Mark Wright of the MK Dons takes a corner during the League One play off semi-final at Glenford Park on May 8, 2009 | © Jamie McDonald/Getty Images
Mark Wright of the MK Dons takes a corner during the League One play off semi-final at Glenford Park on May 8, 2009 | © Jamie McDonald/Getty Images

Shaun Botterill, whose Children Playing Cricket In South Africa image features in the exhibition was asked about capturing his shot. Botterill explained, ‘We’d just finished net practice for a World Cup Cricket match where you are restricted where you can work and move around. Can’t do this, can’t go there etc. (I) walked out and saw these two happy kids having a blast with a stick and a coke can. You couldn’t get a bigger contrast from the corporate, controlled big event to pure carefree fun.’

'Children Playing Cricket In South Africa' | © Shaun Botterill/Getty Images
‘Children Playing Cricket In South Africa’ | © Shaun Botterill/Getty Images

One of the photos included in the exhibition sees French tennis player Gael Monfils diving across the court in a match against Andrey Kuznetsov at 2016’s Australian Open. When Cameron Spencer, who was responsible for the image, was asked why it was special, he explained, ‘This image of Gael Monfils is my favourite editorial image that I have ever taken. It was my 13th straight Australian Open Grand Slam. In all the tennis that I have covered I had never seen anyone dive through the air on the baseline on hardcourt. I couldn’t believe it when it occurred, fortunately I was on the right end of the court on the right lens and correct settings.’

Gael Monfils dives for a forehand at Melbourne Park | © Cameron Spencer/Getty Images
Gael Monfils dives for a forehand at Melbourne Park | © Cameron Spencer/Getty Images

The exhibition runs from June 6, 2017 to July 15, 2017 and admission is free.

Opening hours:

Monday to Friday – 10.00am to 5.30pm

Saturday – 12.00 to 5.30pm