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Four Minutes Twelve Seconds | Courtesy of Ikin Yum
Four Minutes Twelve Seconds | Courtesy of Ikin Yum
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'Four Minutes Twelve Seconds' With Playwright James Fritz

Picture of Chloe Kerr
Updated: 4 January 2017
After last year’s sold-out run, writer of Ross and Rachel, James Fritz brings his his successful play, Four Minutes Twelve Seconds, to Trafalgar Studios. This Olivier Award nominated piece deals with the permanence of the cyber world, and makes you question how well you really know someone. Culture Trip spoke to Fritz to find out more.

What has the reception to Four Minutes Twelve Seconds been like” Do you think certain audience members can relate to the play more than others?

It’s been really great. It’s caused a lot of discussion. We get a lot of gasps and noises in the audience every night, which I love. I think your reaction to it will vary greatly dependent on a few factors: age, gender, whether or not you’re a parent – but that’s the same with any play, really. Some people might relate more strongly to certain aspects than others, but it’s not a play that’s tailored for one specific audience.

Do you identify more with the boy or the parents in the play?

At my age I’m sort of stuck between both generations, so there are probably elements that I identify with in all the characters and elements that I find a bit alien. I wouldn’t want to be in any of their shoes, let’s put it that way.

What kind of an audience do you get for the shows – is it more younger people or is it a mixture?

A nice mixture. One of the best things about the Hampstead run was seeing more and more teenagers popping up in the audience as the weeks went on. It’s a very different play for them than it is for their parents, obviously, but that creates a nice dynamic.

How does it feel to be taking the show to Trafalgar Studios” Is there anything different about this run?

It’s a real bonus, I can’t wait to see it again.

The space is different, so we’re having to recalibrate it slightly, and we’ve got a new cast member in the excellent Anyebe Godwin. So it feels like a new thing with lots of elements of the old thing, which is a perfect balance I think.

How did it feel to be nominated for an Olivier award’

Quite strange. Awards and all that are a bit silly, but at the same time it was important that the nomination was for the whole production and not just for the play itself – I think this show is a great example of a group of people taking a text and collaborating to make it much stronger than it is on the page, so it was nice to have something that acknowledged that.

Do you get nerves ahead of a new run?

Always. I keep having very strange anxiety dreams ahead of next week.

What is your next project?

I’m under commission to a couple of places and I’ve got a BBC Radio Drama on next year. My play Ross and Rachel, which premiered in Edinburgh, will be touring and doing a London run next year as well.

Four Minutes Twelve Seconds is playing at Trafalgar Studios until 5th December 2015.

Trafalgar Studios, 14 Whitehall, London SW1A 2DY, 0844 871 7632