airport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar
Sign In
Sections
Follow Us
Olafur Eliasson, Room for One Colour, 1997. Installation view at Moderna Museet, Stockholm 2015 | © Olafur Eliasson. Photo: Anders Sune Berg
Olafur Eliasson, Room for One Colour, 1997. Installation view at Moderna Museet, Stockholm 2015 | © Olafur Eliasson. Photo: Anders Sune Berg
add to wishlistsCreated with Sketch.

Don’t Miss These Blockbuster Exhibitions in London

Picture of Freire Barnes
Art & Design Editor
Updated: 12 February 2018
From major retrospectives to rare chances to see previously unseen works, London’s art calendar is full to the brim, with something for everyone, whether you’re an Impressionist buff or a photography enthusiast.

Monochrome: Painting in Black and White at National Gallery

When you think of black-and-white art, no doubt, photography or Op art springs to mind. Rarely would you think that artists like Rembrandt or van Eyck worked in monochrome. For their winter blockbuster, the National Gallery brings together paintings and drawings by Old Masters through to contemporary artists to explore what happens when the colour spectrum is reduced to the minimum. Including early examples of Medieval grisaille (grey monochrome painting) work, Albrecht Dürer drawings, Kazimir Malevich’s revolutionary Black Square (1929) painting and Olafur Eliasson’s immersive light installation that suppresses other light frequencies, the show will leave you seeing the power of monochrome.

Monochrome: Painting in Black and White is on until February 18, 2018. £16 weekends, £14 weekdays.

Olafur Eliasson, Room for One Colour, 1997. Installation view at Moderna Museet, Stockholm 2015
Olafur Eliasson, Room for One Colour, 1997. Installation view at Moderna Museet, Stockholm 2015 | © Olafur Eliasson. Photo: Anders Sune Berg

Modigliani at Tate Modern

Among the many highlights of this outstandingly comprehensive exhibition of the Italian artist will no doubt be his nudes. From the best-loved to the controversially-explicit, Modigliani’s approach to representing the naked female form, transformed figurative painting and here you’ll be able to see the largest group ever compiled in the UK. Although Modigliani died at the young age of 35, he carved a career through continual experimentation that deems him one of the greatest artists of 20th century.

Modigliani is on until April 2, 2018. £18.50, concs £15.

Modigliani, Seated Nude, 1917
Modigliani, Seated Nude, 1917 | Royal Museum of Fine Arts Antwerp, Lukasart in Flanders
. Photo credit: Hugo Maertens

Age of Terror at IWM

This landmark exhibition brings together works made since the 2001 terrorist attacks in New York. From Film and installations to painting and sculpture by internationally renowned artists including Grayson Perry, Ai Weiwei, Jenny Holzer, and Jake & Dinos Chapman, the exhibition will address the complex issues faced around the world today that isn’t often reflected in the mainstream media. Each artist’s response to conflict, war and a heightened state of emergency will give a different perspective on this daily global issue.

Age of Terror: Art since 9/11 is on until May 28, 2018. £15, concs £7.50-£10.50.

Omer Fast, 5000 Feet is the Best, 2011
Omer Fast, 5000 Feet is the Best, 2011 | © Omer Fast

Impressionists in London at Tate Britain

In the 1870’s, French artists such as Monet, Pissarro, Sisley and Derain sought refuge in London as they fled the devastation of the Franco-Prussian war. Their period of exile across the Channel proved an exceptionally fruitful one for both the development of the French artists as well as the British art scene. For the first time, the influential relationships between French and British artists as well as the art dealers and patrons is explored in this illuminating exhibition that includes everything from depictions of recreational London pursuits and extensive studies of the Thames to the examination of art dealer Paul Durand-Ruel’s important role in establishing Impressionism as a movement.

Impressionists in London, French Artists in Exile (1870-1904) is on until April 29, 2018. £17.70, concs £15.90.

Camille Pissarro, Charing Cross Bridge, 1890
Camille Pissarro, Charing Cross Bridge, 1890 | Collection of Mr. and Mrs. Paul Mellon. Courtesy of National Gallery of Art, Washington

Want to see more art in London? These are the best free exhibitions to see in the city.