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Pablo Bronstein, Beach Hut in the style of Nicholas Hawksmoor, 2014 | © Stuart Wilson
Pablo Bronstein, Beach Hut in the style of Nicholas Hawksmoor, 2014 | © Stuart Wilson
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Line-up of International Artists to Transform Folkestone for 2017 Triennial

Picture of Freire Barnes
Art & Design Editor
Updated: 2 March 2017
With 184 days to go until the next Folkestone Triennial, today curator Lewis Biggs and Alastair Upton of Creative Foundation announced the line-up of this year’s commissioned artists.

Since 2008, the south-east England coastal town of Folkestone, has become an unlikely location for ambitious, engaging and dynamic artistic interventions. For the fourth iteration of the triennial, 21 new site-specific commissions will transform the town’s public spaces into a gallery without walls.

Richard Woods, Holiday Home, 2017
Richard Woods, Holiday Home, 2017 | Courtesy of Folkestone Triennial

From wanting to enhance the mosque to recreating Victorian lampposts, each of the international line-up, that includes Antony Gormley, Wong Hoy Cheong and Sol Calero, have focused on very different aspects of the town. Richard Woods’ witty Holiday Home sculptures, that will be sited at various locations, highlight the ‘so-called “housing-crisis” in the South East of England’, while Lubaina Himid’s proposal of a Jelly Mould Pavilion considers the ‘role of sugar in Britain’s history’.

Lubaina Himid, Jelly Mould Pavilion, 2017
Lubaina Himid, Jelly Mould Pavilion, 2017 | Courtesy of Folkestone Triennial

The theme of this year’s exhibition, double edge, which refers to the town’s historical and geographic axis, continues the pursuit of previous triennials by considering ‘sense of place’ and asks the artists to respond to the ‘physical and conceptual context of Folkestone’.

‘Great art is a mirror to the world, and this exhibition gives artists the opportunity to make new work that plays with ambiguity and stimulates audiences to consider broader issues such as why the world is the way it is, how it might be, and how change is always possible,’ said Lewis Biggs, curator of Folkestone Triennial.

Bob and Roberta Smith, Folkestone is an Art School, 2017
Bob and Roberta Smith, Folkestone is an Art School, 2017

One such artist wanting to action change and give Folkestone its own art school is Bob and Roberta Smith. An avid campaigner for arts education, the London-based artist has started a crowdfunding campaign hosted by Art Fund and proposes a number of banners declaring that ‘FOLKESTONE IS AN ART SCHOOL’ throughout the town.

Michael Sailstorfer, Folkestone Digs, Folkestone Triennial 2014
Michael Sailstorfer, Folkestone Digs, Folkestone Triennial 2014 | Photo Stuart Wilson

Over the years the town’s people have become treasure hunters when Berlin-based artist Michael Sailstorfer buried 30 pieces of 24-carat gold in the beach – 23 are still yet to be found – and the derelict Harbour Railway Station found new purpose with Tim Etchells’ neon artwork.

Tim Etchells, Is Why the Place, 2014
Tim Etchells, Is Why the Place, 2014 | Courtesy Thierry Bal

Folkestone Triennale: double edge will be at various locations of the Kent town from September 2 to November 5, 2017.