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Things to Do in Wolverhampton

Wightwick Manor and Gardens
Wightwick Manor and Gardens | © Les Wiggin / Flickr
From Premier League football to a Victorian manor and gardens, there’s more to Wolverhampton than meets the eye.

Wolverhampton is often overlooked due to its proximity to the UK’s second city Birmingham. However, there’s plenty to do in the city, so discover some of the best things to do in Wolverhampton, including a stunning manor, an independent cinema and one of the country’s oldest breweries.

Watch Wolverhampton Wanderers play a match

Wolverhampton Wanderers are on the up. Following their promotion to the Premier League they’ve managed to attract some top-class players and are holding their own in the big league. However, with these good performances comes a massive increase in popularity. There are various eligibility criteria, and with season-ticket holders bagging in-demand tickets, tickets can be difficult to get hold of if you’re not a Wolves fan. If match day isn’t your thing, why not visit the Wolves Museum, or try a stadium tour to take a look behind the scenes?

Wolves' Molineux Stadium © Ungry Young Man / Flickr

Take a tour of Banks’s Brewery

Providing good beer to the people of Wolverhampton since 1875, Banks’s Brewery is one of the longest-running cask ale breweries in the country. On a brewery tour, beer lovers can discover how Banks’s make their signature ales, learn about the fermentation process and even try some beer at the end of the tour. Like what you taste? Make sure you don’t skip the gift shop!

Go on a Wolverhampton City Centre Walking Trail

For those looking to delve into the history and heritage of Wolverhampton, this walking trail will be right up your street. It covers around 1.6 kilometres (one mile) of the city’s most important sights, and you’ll be able to spot the city’s prominent landmarks, including St Peter’s Church and the statue of Prince Albert. More information on the tour, which starts and ends in Queen Square, can be obtained at the city’s Visitor Information Centre or via the city council’s website.

St Peter's Church, Wolverhampton © PaulCosmin / Pixabay

Catch a film at Light House Cinema

Proudly to be the only independent cinema in The Black Country, Light House is a registered charity that offers something for everyone, with blockbuster films shown alongside galleries, exhibition spaces and a café bar, all set within the Victorian architecture of The Chubb Buildings. Do check out Light House rather than heading to a cinema chain.

Get crafty at Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Located right in the centre of the city, Wolverhampton Art Gallery houses more than 300 years of art. Open since 1884, this free-to-enter gallery showcases everything from local history and Old Master paintings to fossils and archaeological collections. Black Country aficionados will be in their element at the gallery’s shop, which stocks contemporary collections by local artists and craftspeople. Wolverhampton Art Gallery is child-friendly and regularly hosts events for all the family.

Wolverhampton Art Gallery © Wolverhampton Art Gallery

Watch a touring production at The Grand Theatre

Wolverhampton is the proud home of the 1,200-capacity Grand Theatre, a Grade II-listed building that opened in 1894. Theatre enthusiasts in the West Midlands will be able to watch some of the most internationally renowned touring plays here. The Grand Theatre, which hosted Charlie Chaplin in 1902 and Winston Churchill in 1909, also hosts live music, comedy and pantomimes.

Find your zen at Wightwick Manor and Gardens

Those looking for something a little less city-centred should look no further than Wightwick Manor and Gardens. Situated just a 15-minute drive from central Wolverhampton, this National Trust estate is home to a beautiful Victorian timber-framed manor that houses a fantastic collection of Pre-Raphaelite art. The manor, which gives a nod to British textile designer William Morris with its rich tapestries and threads, is flanked by 14 acres (seven hectares) of stunning woodland and gardens ideal for forgetting the hustle and bustle of city life.

Wightwick Manor and Gardens © Les Wiggin / Flickr