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"Grandma's" by Jake Townsend | Courtesy of LHR Exhibitions
"Grandma's" by Jake Townsend | Courtesy of LHR Exhibitions
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Things I Think About When... Interview With Mr. Gresty

Picture of Chloe Kerr
Updated: 28 November 2015
Designer, illustrator, artist, curator… what can’t Mr. Gresty do” Two years ago he set up the LHR Exhibitions series to help other artists get exposure for their work, and we managed to catch up with him ahead of his 15th LHR Exhibition, The Things I Think About When I Think Of Thinking. Read below to learn more about this talented artist.

 

'Grandma's' by Jake Townsend | Courtesy of LHR Exhibitions

‘Grandma’s’ by Jake Townsend | Courtesy of LHR Exhibitions

TCT: How are you feeling about this exhibition and what was the inspiration for it”

I am looking forward to seeing The Things I Think About, When I Think About Thinking, hung and completing the room layout. The styles of work are so eclectic, it makes for a really interesting collection. The exhibition format is the same as all the previous LHR exhibitions, but this time we have lots of new talent.

My inspiration is to help creatives get their work seen by as many people as possible, while not taking any of their cash when work is sold.

 

TCT: You have been curating LHR exhibitions for the past 2 years. What in your opinion is special about this one? 

The 15th LHR Exhibition – The Things I Think About, When I Think About Thinking – is the most open brief yet. I had been thinking about the mainstream media, TV, radio, music videos, and that if something is bland and non-threatening it does well (in my opinion). I have created a small handful of pieces over the last few years that I am happy with, and others that I’m personally not keen on. These sell and my favourite pieces don’t sell so well. So the brief was for the artists to submit their very own favourite personal piece, not following trends or public demand.

Art at the Hanbury | Courtesy of Chloe Kerr

Art at the Hanbury | Courtesy of Chloe Kerr

TCT: And what was your inspiration for creating the LHR exhibitions? 

I wanted to be able to hang a collection of work, where lots of people would see it, hear about the artists, and they wouldn’t have to pay to see it. At the same time, I wanted it to be available to purchase, and when a piece sold, for that artist to be able to keep 100% of the money.

I don’t think a bar is the best environment for art, but it helps me achieve the issue of cost. All it takes is some time and life is long, I have lots of free time!

 

Artwork by Lee Bromfield | Courtesy of LHR Exhibitions

Artwork by Lee Bromfield | Courtesy of LHR Exhibitions

TCT: When did you make the move from designer to curator and why?

In 2010, I started screen-printing, after enjoying it at uni. I was in a bar in Clapton, and soon after speaking to the owner about the art on his walls, he said if I was interested I could put work up! I said yes. At this point I had only created two typographic screen-prints. After a few solid weeks of printing lots of ideas from a sketchbook, I hung my first solo exhibition. Five years later I’m getting ready to hang my 22nd exhibition.

With the mixed exhibitions I enjoy seeing the variety of creative solutions to the same brief, and I like seeing my name in the line-up with an artist who I admire. The most creative and challenging exhibition was Whisper, based on the old game ‘Chinese Whispers.’ I illustrated the first piece and gave it a title, I passed that title to the next artist and told them they could change the title slightly and that the new title was their brief, then I passed their title to the next artist and so on!

 

TCT: Do you think this kind of multitasking is the future of the industry, or is it better to stick to one skill?

Of course both options work for different people, in the commercial world this could look good on a CV, but on the other hand you can come across as a Jack-of-all-trades, master of none. Some creatives will evolve their style and move on to the next thing that they are passionate about and pick up skills along the way.

 

The Things I Think About When I Think Of Thinking Exhibition is free, and open until 31 January 2016.

The Hanbury Arms, 33 Linton Street, Arlington Square, London, UK +44 207 288 2222

 

By Chloe Kerr