Eindhoven Is Building The World's First Habitable 3D-Printed Housesairport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar

Eindhoven Is Building The World's First Habitable 3D-Printed Houses

An artist's impression of Project Milestone
An artist's impression of Project Milestone | © Houben and Van Mierlo architecten
Five 3D-printed homes are currently under development in Eindhoven, the Netherlands and will welcome their first tenants in mid-2019. The people behind this innovative housing project believe that 3D printing technology can cut down costs related to construction and allow architects to design state-of-the-art homes that are adapted around modern living.

As the buildings are intended for renters, they will be the first-ever commercially available 3D-printed houses in the world. The houses, which are collectively known as Project Milestone, are suitable for families and will enter the rental market next year. The first house slated for completion will feature three rooms spread over one storey, while the other four properties will have two or more floors.

An artist's impression of Project Milestone © Houben and Van Mierlo architecten

To build the homes in question, developers will use a high-tech 3D printer that constructs sturdy concrete walls by layering together multiple tiers of cement. This machine follows designs created by architects and can print flowing or circular shapes quickly and efficiently. Aside from its versatility, the machine reportedly uses less material than other, more conventional construction methods and produces very little waste due to its pinpoint accuracy.

An artist's impression of Project Milestone © Houben and Van Mierlo architecten

The houses will be built one after another, in order for the team behind Project Milestone to evaluate their techniques and adapt their designs over time. Though there are clear plans in the pipeline, the project is deliberately experimental and may change course during its development. For instance, it is possible that some houses will feature wireless sensors in their walls, creating a ‘smart’ environment that allows occupants to easily control their home’s heating, lighting and security systems.

The first set of houses will be printed at the University of Eindhoven (one of the project’s chief partners) and then, assembled in a suburban neighbourhood called Meerhoven. Eventually, the 3D printer will be moved to the aforementioned construction site, where it will build the material needed for the final houses, which, in turn, will reduce financial costs and CO2 emissions linked to transportation.

For more information about the houses, check out the following video courtesy of Project Milestone, Eindhoven.