airport_transferbarbathtubbusiness_facilitieschild_activitieschildcareconnecting_roomcribsfree_wifigymhot_tubinternetkitchennon_smokingpetpoolresturantski_in_outski_shuttleski_storagesmoking_areaspastar
Sign In
Marknad | © La Citta Vita/Flickr
Marknad | © La Citta Vita/Flickr
Save to wishlist

10 of the Best Markets in Sweden

Picture of Judi Lembke
Updated: 23 May 2017
Sweden’s best markets can be found all over the country, in small towns and big cities – and, even better, they also have something called loppis, which are sort of like flea markets but small and often tucked away in an old barn. Whether it’s food, clothes, or curiousities you’re looking for, there’s plenty of choice at Swedish markets.

Stockholm

Save to wishlist

Hornstulls Marknad

Located along the waters of Hornstull Strand on the far western end of Södermalm, Hornstulls Marknad is a trendy weekend gathering spot where you’ll find everything from vintage clothing to old Super 8 movie projectors and bikes. It’s a gorgeous spot and the good news is that this is where Stockholm’s growing number of food trucks like to gather on a gorgeous weekend day.

Hornstulls Marknad, Hornstull Strand, Stockholm, Sweden

Swedish markets
Visit Stockholm’s favourite weekend market at Hornstull Strand | ©Peter Fristedt / Flickr

Karla Loppis

This is a relatively new entry on the Stockholm market scene but it’s growing fast, and is a great place to find top-tier vintage. Located along the perimetre of Karlaplan’s giant fountain in the city’s Östermalm district, this market is all about books, clothes, paintings, and collectables. Given its location, gems are to be had if you’ve got the time to poke around for a bit. A great atmosphere and plenty of restaurants close by.

Karla Loppis, Karlaplan, Stockholm, Sweden

Save to wishlist

Hötorget

This bustling market has several layers: the indoor food market downstairs, where you can find exotic foods such as wild boar, and the lively produce market in the square, where vendors happily shout to one another and to passers-by as they sell their wares. In the square some bargaining is acceptable, and on Sundays it turns into a giant flea market, where you can also bargain as you pick up vinyl, clothes, china, and pretty much anything else.

Hötorget, Stockholm, Sweden

Swedish markets

Hötorget produce market | © Hans Hansson / Flickr

Malmö

Save to wishlist

Malmö Farmers Market

The market at Drottningtorget sets up shop every Saturday morning from mid-spring to mid-autumn – and this is where farmers from the surrounding area head to and give city folk the chance to enjoy that fresh-from-the-farm taste. Swedish favourites such as chanterelles and wild strawberries are sure to be found, as well as homemade preserves and the like. If you visit on a Saturday, it’s a giant flea market with all that that entails.

Malmö Farmers Market, Drottningtorget, Malmö, Sweden

Möllevångstorget

It’s no surprise that multicultural Malmö has a market that is brimming with produce and other ingredients that might not be found in your regular Swedish grocery store. And it’s no surprise that in the hustle and bustle of this market haggling is the word of the day, and that you’ll discover fruit and veg that will inspire you. One of the best markets around.

Möllevångstorget, Malmö, Sweden

Swedish markets
Malmö’s delightful and popular food market | ©Susanne Nilsson / Flickr

Lund

Save to wishlist

Södra Esplanaden

Lund is the biggest university town in Sweden and it’s also home to the Skåne region’s largest street market. When the weather gets warmer everyone heads down to Drottningtorget to wander through the seemingly endless stands selling everything under the sun. Top tip: this market is where professional vintage dealers go, so keep your eye open for great finds.

Uppsala

Save to wishlist

Vaksala Torg

Open every Saturday from early in the morning until late in the afternoon all year round, this market has a lot of stuff to pick through, including vintage clothing, shoes, and accessories, as well as furniture, books, vinyl, electronics, and pretty much anything else you can think of. Get here early, though – this is a popular destination for locals and they’ll have picked through the best offerings long before you’ve had breakfast.

Vaksala Torg, Uppsala, Sweden

Swedish markets

Uppsala’s markets are bursting with bargains | © Upplandsmuseet Länsmuseum för Uppsala län / Flickr

Gothenburg

Save to wishlist

Kommersen Loppmarknad

Since 2000, savvy Gothenburgers have been heading to this 1400-square metre building to poke around the more than 100 tables that set up shop here. There is a vast amount of second-hand goods, from antiques and books to children’s and adult clothing. Open only on the weekends, Kommersen Loppmarknad is an absolute treasure trove of unexpected things you didn’t know you needed.

Kommersen Loppmarknad, Masthamnsgatan, Gothenburg, Sweden

Save to wishlist

Saluhall

It’s the biggest market hall in town, with nearly forty shops offering coffee, cheese, fruit, spices, proteins, and much, much more from all over the world. It’s a classic Swedish indoor market, housed in a beautiful building and, while the prices are a bit higher than a regular grocery store, the quality is there. There are also great restaurants serving up Swedish classics.

Saluhall, Kungstorget, Gothenburg, Sweden

Swedish markets

Discover Swedish delicacies at Gothenburg’s Saluhall | © Rolf Broberg/Wikipedia Commons

Umeå

Save to wishlist

Umeå Arena

If you’ve made it way up north, be sure to check out this market, which offers a wonderful selection of local delicacies, including vegetables, honey, cheese, bread, mushrooms, and much more. And remember, the produce up north is unique, so this is a great chance to try it out.

Umeå Farmers Market, Kyrkhamnsvägen 36, Umeå, Sweden

Save to wishlist

Nolia

Bargains galore at this Umeå flea market and, since Nolia is not overrun with stylists on the make, like you’d find in Stockholm, Malmö, or Gothenburg, you’re well-placed to find some unique items.

Nolia, Umeå, Sweden

Swedish markets

Head to Umeå for unsullied markets | © Meike Wiemann/Wikipedia Commons