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What They’re Reading In Spain Fall 2016
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What They’re Reading In Spain Fall 2016

Picture of Culture Trip
Updated: 22 March 2017
Time to wrap up those towels, put away the parasol, and prepare for the return of the chestnut sellers and those crisp, sunny sunsets. That’s right, autumn is slowly creeping up on us, and as the days start to get shorter we’ll be looking for the next good read to keep us company. This season it’s all about psychological thrillers here in Spain, both from the Anglo-Saxon world and Spain’s own masters of the genre – but as always there’s room for a little romance too. Here’s our guide to what will be topping the literary charts in Spain this autumn.

The Girl On The Train (La Chica Del Tren) by Paula Hawkins

This latest novel by British author Paula Hawkins is proving quite a hit in Spain following its success abroad and its number one spot on The New York Times‘ Fiction Bestsellers of 2015. A gripping psychological thriller, The Girl On The Train follows the lives of three women as they become embroiled in a sordid tale of marital infidelity, manipulation, and murder – raising the question of just how much you can trust your own memory. Due to be released as a feature film later this autumn, The Girl On The Train has been at the top of everyone’s reading list on the beach this summer and looks to be going nowhere for the time being.

Donde los Escorpiones by Lorenzo Silva

One of Spain’s great masters of the roman noir, Lorenzo Silva has done it again with this latest thriller Donde Los Escorpiones – roughly translated as ‘Where The Scorpions’. This is the latest addition to his series about the life of the charismatic sub-lieutenant Bevilacqua, the fifty-something-year-old homicide detective living in modern day Madrid. In Donde Los Escorpiones, Bevilacqua is lead to investigate his first murder outside of Spain, leading him to a military base in Afghanistan where a Spanish soldier was murdered. Is this an attack by the Taliban or is there something unexpected going on behind the scenes?

The Widow (La Viuda) by Fiona Barton

This Times Bestseller is the masterpiece of British journalist and reporter Fiona Barton, who explains that the novel was born from her experience in and out court covering high-profile trials. In this suspenseful psychological thriller she addresses the question that long eaten away at her, namely just how much do the wives of those accused know about their husbands’ misdoings. The Widow follows the events in Jean Taylor’s life – a quiet woman who mostly keeps to herself, except when her husband is implicated in the case of a missing child. What does she really know? What does she allow herself to know? This novel is an innovative roman noir in which the author’s real-life experience brings brilliant richness and complexity to the text.

El Dia Que Se Caiga El Cielo by Megan Maxwell

If you’re looking for romance and the odd sob, then Megan Maxwell’s latest novel is the answer. El Día Que Se Caiga El Cielo – The Day The Sky Falls – tells the story of two childhood friends, Alba and Nacho, who grow distant when Alba marries, only to be reunited years later when Nacho loses his wife and Alba separates from her husband. But their misfortune doesn’t end there and soon Alba is having to cope with Nacho’s recent diagnosis of terminal illness. But could her fortune be about to change? It looks like true love might finally be around the corner, but just when she least expects it.

El Libro de las Pequeñas Revoluciones by Elsa Punset

For many September is the start of a new cycle – back to school, back to work, back to routine – and what better time to set some positive intentions for the coming year with a little self-help. Elsa Punset studied philosophy at Oxford University and has written a number of books aimed at helping people cope with the complexities and difficulties of everyday life. Her latest number, ‘The Book Of Small Revolutions‘, offers a DIY approach to dealing with everything from sorrow to disappointment to anger, and offers practical advice to create new, healthier routines to cope with life.