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El Rastro flea market | © Míriam Pérez/Flickr
El Rastro flea market | © Míriam Pérez/Flickr
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The Best Places for Cheap Shopping in Madrid  

Picture of Jessica Jones
Updated: 10 January 2018
Madrid is a great destination for shopping fans, home to everything from designer stores to hand-crafted local goods. If you’re on a budget or looking for a bargain, we’ve got the perfect guide to the city’s local markets, reasonable neighbourhoods and the best affordable shopping in Madrid.

El Rastro

Madrid’s biggest and most famous flea market takes place every Sunday and on public holiday between the neighbourhoods of La Latina and Lavapiés. The stalls sell everything from leather bags and band T-shirts to antiques, records and flamenco-themed wares. Make sure to arrive early as the market reaches its busiest peak at around midday, and don’t forget to make a stop for a beer and a tapa like the locals do.

El Rastro market
El Rastro market | ©Nicolas Vigier/Flickr

Food markets

If you want to save a few euros on food, check out some of Madrid’s under-the-radar food markets. For fresh food like fish, meat and vegetables, Mercado de la Cebada in La Latina is a great choice (stalls will cook the fish you buy for you on Saturday afternoons, making it one of the best times to visit). If you want food that’s ready to eat, Mercado de San Fernando in Lavapiés, is a popular local choice and prices are low.

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Mercado de la Cebada | © Marta Nimeva Nimeviene/Flickr

Vintage shops

The cool neighbourhood of Malasaña, just north of Gran Vía, is the centre of Madrid’s vintage scene: it has many vintage shops with some specialising in certain eras (1970s denim, for example). Calle Velarde is home to several shops, such as Magpie Vintage and Alphaville. Just a few blocks away from Magpie, Flamingos Vintage Kilo sells clothes by the kilogram.

Gran Vía

Madrid’s most famous street is home to grand buildings and Spain’s biggest mainstream stores. If you’re eager to explore the likes of Zara, Mango and Stradivarius, this is the place, and you’ll also find the biggest Primark store in all of mainland Europe. It’s conveniently located right in the centre of Madrid, which means you’ll be spoilt for choice when you need a break from shopping and are looking for a drink or something to eat.

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Madrid’s Gran Vía | © Julius_Silver/Pixabay

Cuesta de Moyano book stalls

Bookworms will love perusing the lovely wooden book stalls found near Parque El Retiro, which have been going strong since 1925. The stalls are open every day and sell mainly second-hand books in Spanish, though there is sometimes a selection in other languages too.

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Cuesta de Moyano | © M a n u e l/Flickr

Shopping centres

If you don’t fancy facing the crowds of central Madrid, or maybe the weather is not too pleasant, a trip to an out-of-town shopping centre could be a good option. There are several shopping centres around Madrid, many of which are home to all the major high street stores, as well as cinemas. Las Rozas Village is Madrid’s biggest designer discount shopping centre, and is very popular with bargain hunters.

Local designer markets

For a great chance to pick up a unique gift or souvenir, visit any of the several markets around Madrid where local designers sell their creations. Mercado de Motores, a market held in Madrid’s railway museum, takes place over a weekend once a month and makes for a great day out (you can even grab lunch at one of the food trucks outside). The Matadero, Madrid’s former slaughterhouse, is now a thriving cultural hub that also regularly hosts markets.