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Costa del Sol © Bogdan Migulski/Flickr
Costa del Sol © Bogdan Migulski/Flickr
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The Best Coastal Towns In Costa Del Sol, Málaga

Picture of Dea Angan
Updated: 9 February 2017
Situated in the province of Málaga, in the south of Spain, Costa del Sol (or Coast of the Sun, in English) is among the most popular tourist destinations in Spain. Having marvelous weather (with over 300 days of sun a year) ensures that Costa del Sol gets bombarded by tourists any time of the year. Coming to Costa del Sol means finding not only beautiful landscapes and scenery, but also outstanding beaches. Each coastal town is rich in cultural heritage and tasty food. Yet, the following coastal towns in Costa del Sol need to be on any traveler’s list.

Benalmádena Costa

Benalmádena Costa is one of the three main urban areas in Benalmádena. It has become one of Costa del Sol’s most essential locations, with its golden sandy beaches. It welcomes a huge number of tourists every year, and residents have created variety of chiringuitos (beach bars) and restaurants, offering delicious fresh fish dishes and other local food. Visitors will hardly encounter boredom in Benalmádena Costa, since they will be spoiled with a wide array of activities and places to visit. Puerto Marina (Marine Port), Selwo Marina (the Sea Life Center), and Parque de las Palomas (Dove Park) are top-notch destinations aside from the stunning beaches.

Benalmádena Costa © Tiia Monto/WikiCommons
Puerto Marina in Benalmádena | © Tiia Monto/WikiCommons

Torremolinos

Torremolinos is the perfect blend of a cosmopolitan town and a traditional Andalusian fishing village. With its seven kilometers-long coastline, Torremolinos offers wonderful, seafront promenades. Aqualand and the Crocodile Park are the perfect alternatives for visitors who seek non-beach diversion. Additionally, nightlife lovers can opt for bars and nightclubs in Los Álamos or La Nogalera for truly great nighttime entertainment.

Torremolinos © Tiia Monto/WikiCommons
View from Torre Mirador towards east, Torremolinos | © Tiia Monto/WikiCommons

Fuengirola

Fuengirola was once a small fishing village before it became a vibrant cosmopolitan town. Chic boutiques, fabulous beaches and a variety of tapas bars and restaurants have turned Fuengirola into a perfect holiday destination. One of its main attractions are the amazing seven kilometers of sandy beaches, stretching from Torreblanca to Sohail Castle. Water sports are essential in Fuengirola. The town has several diving schools, offering local residents and visitors the opportunity to learn scuba diving.

Fuengirola © Olaf Tausch/WikiCommons
Fuengirola Playa 05 | © Olaf Tausch/WikiCommons
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Marbella

Being one of the favorite destinations for travelers worldwide, Marbella successfully attracts visitors due to its diverse beaches, cosmopolitan atmosphere, mild climate, and world-class nightlife. The flower-filled plazas and narrow cobbled streets in the Old Town and Plaza the los Naranjos (Orange Tree Square) are filled with delightful shops and art galleries. On the other hand, Puerto Banus offers contemporary fashion shops selling designer labels and luxury items.

Estepona

With its 21 kilometers of coastline, Estepona has become the perfect home for numerous wonderful beaches. It is one of the few coastal towns which has been successful in maintaining the village character and charm, despite the blitz of tourism. Its bursting and atmospheric center attract visitors each year, especially in summer. A number of restaurants serve everything from Mediterranean cuisine to traditional food. The char-grilled sardines and fritura malagueña (mixed fried fish platter) are definitely worth the try.

Málaga

Málaga is not only worth visiting for its beaches, but also for its cultural and historical architecture. Countless destinations are spread along its areas. The Alcazaba de Málaga, for instance, will guide you through the Roman amphitheater combined with 11th-century Moorish fortress. Additionally, Castillo de Gibralfaro (Gibralfaro Castle) will take you back to the times of Málaga’s Islamic civilization, while enjoying breathtaking views of the city from the hill. Arts lovers need to visit the Picasso Museum to admire Picasso‘s wonderful paintings.

Málaga © Agapito/WikiCommons
Landscape of Malaga | © Agapito/WikiCommons