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Fashion on Wheels Is Taking Over Polish Streets

Picture of Weronika Jurkiewicz
Weronika Jurkiewicz
Updated: 24 August 2017

Food trucks have already conquered Polish streets, hearts and stomachs, but the movable retail concept has a new group of fans: fashionistas. Lured by its low costs and the flexibility to reach a wider customer base, young retailers redecorated old cars and hit the road to woo festival-goers around the country. We talked with the owners of two popular Polish fashion trucks to discover why they decided to ditch their air-conned boutiques for life on the road.

FU-KU

Dedicated to promoting Polish slow fashion, FU-KU truck is an old Mercedes-turned-boutique. “Everything started more than 6 years ago in Wroclaw, when we set up our stationary boutique, Fu-Ku Concept Store, which of course functions to this day,” Linda Parys from FU-KU told Culture Trip. “The fashion truck combines years of experience running a traditional boutique and is an extension of our desire to meet our customers – not just those in Wroclaw or online. The truck is a space – both inside and outside (around our truck we build a chillout zone with FU-KU sun-loungers) to build new friendships!”

The truck features garments and accessories from a variety of up-and-coming and more established brands, including RISK made in Warsaw, Yeah Bunny, Brylove and The Odder Side. Linda Parys mentioned that this season’s hit are ‘Pockets,’ aka t-shirts with a surprise hidden in the pocket. “We try to choose things that will meet the expectations of customers in a given city, so whenever we give information where we are, you can write to us with questions about a specific brand or product.” Customers can also order anything they see at the Fu-Ku Fashion Truck online. 

Having a truck also allows FU-KU to create stronger, personal bonds with their consumers. “Thanks to the mobility of our boutique on wheels, we can spend a weekend in another city, visiting, and above all, meeting and talking with other people interested in slow fashion and Polish projects – we can accompany them on their holidays and co-create memories,” Parys added.

Even though FU-KU is busy driving from one festival to the next, they also cater to private events. “Last year, a boyfriend ordered our Fu-Ku Fashion Truck as a gift for his girlfriend’s birthday party! She got a voucher which she could immediately use. It was better than having the clothes delivered from an online store!”

Mozaika

A stylist’s dream, Mozaika features second-hand clothes from famous designers as well as pieces tweaked by Kasia and Tomek Iszler, the shop’s owners. In their truck, vintage hunters can discover unique and funky garments. “Our truck is very retro, very atmospheric and old school. Its design is impressive, and the small space invites people to have a conversation,” Kasia Iszler told Culture Trip.

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Mozaika began as a standalone boutique, located on Świętojańska 13, in Gdynia (where you can still find it) as well as an online retailer. “We want people to dress originally, in colour, but also to buy eco and realise that second-hand items can look like new,” Iszler added. “We have been running for five years and we have never had two identical things. We have limited editions, hand-made projects, and garments from top-notch designers.”

The original store rose in popularity at least partially due to Iszler’s own designs. “We customise and sew the clothes ourselves, giving them a second life and a hunk of modernity. We remodel and personalise denim jackets and shorts by hand. We paint on the fabrics or we turn a coat into a skirt and vice versa. We never repeat our projects, so each piece is truly unique.”

Mozaika supports Polish designers, with one of the racks in-store often only featuring the work of local designers. Iszler is optimistic about the future of Polish fashion as well as the fashion truck trend, hoping that more retailers and designers will make the switch to four wheels. The trend has already conquered the hearts of the fashion elite at almost every major festival this summer, so watch this space.