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Warsaw | © Shutterstock
Warsaw | © Shutterstock
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12 of the Most Unusual Experiences in Warsaw

Picture of Weronika Jurkiewicz
Updated: 8 June 2017
Though Warsaw’s popular museums and attractions are much-loved, sometimes a break from the sightseeing norm can give a glimpse of what really makes a city tick. Poland‘s capital has much to offer thanks to its long history and diverse neighborhoods, including a series of quirky experiences that are wholly unique to Warsaw. For more on seeing things from a different angle, take a look at our guide to the city’s top 12 unusual experiences.

Ditch the history books for murals

From commemorating the capital’s famous inhabitants, including Chopin and Maria Skłodowska-Curie, to commenting on its past, Warsaw’s murals tell the city’s story in a unique and vibrant way. A scavenger hunt makes for a fun way to spot as many as you can, but for those short on time, here are the key must-see murals:

Puppet Soldiers Mural, ul. Sienna 45, Warsaw, Poland

Stanisław Grzesiuk Mural, ul. Puławska 143, Warsaw, Poland

Marek Edleman Mural, ul Nowolipki 9b, Warsaw, Poland

Urodziłam się w Warszawie Mural, ul. Lipowa 3, Warsaw, Poland

Mural Maria Skłodowska Curie I
Mural Maria Skłodowska Curie I | © Adrian Grycuk

See the city’s (neon) lights

Neons are an integral part of Warsaw, and even though a lot of them were retired to the Museum of Neons, new ones continue to populate the city’s streets. Their popularity dates back to the 1950s, when the Communist government ‘neonised’ Warsaw in an attempt to bring Western glamour to the streets and turn the city into the European capital of neons. Today these old-school signs have to compete with billboards and posters, but remain an interesting visual reminder of the city’s past.

Go for a six-hour walk in the park

Warsaw offers a unique opportunity to cross the city from north to south without ever leaving a park. Starting at the Citadel in Żoliborz and continuing all the way to Królikarnia in Mokotów, the green walking and cycling trail is located on the Warsaw escarpment and takes about six hours to complete. The many café-clubs and cultural institutions along the way make for a great pit stop or two if your legs get tired.

Łazienki Królewskie I
Łazienki Królewskie I | © piotrgorzko/Pixabay

Have a barbecue by the river

Not many European capitals let you light a campfire in the middle of the city, but head to the east bank of the Vistula River and you can enjoy a barbecue with the view of the Old Town in the background.

Find all the shrines to Saint Mary

Dozens of small shrines hide inside courtyards around the city, most of them in the Old Praga neighbourhood. Usually featuring a large statue of Virgin Mary, candles and flowers, the shrines were built during World War II, as a symbol of resistance and hope. Those who want to see them should head to Ząbkowska, Targowa and Kępna streets – just be mindful not to disturb the local communities.

See where Polański shot The Pianist

Before leaving the east bank and heading back to the city center, film buffs should go for a walk around Stalowa, Ząbkowska, Konopacka and Mała streets, where Roman Polański shot The Pianist. The iconic movie tells a story of Włdysław Szpilman (played by Adrien Brody in an Oscar-winning turn), a Polish Jewish pianist struggling to survive in the Warsaw Ghetto during World War II.

Discover Jewish Warsaw

Before World War II, Warsaw’s Jewish community was second only to New York City’s in terms of size. Today addresses such as Umschlagplatz, Próżna Street, and Chłodna Street, as well as Nożyk Synagogue, and a fragment of Ghetto Wall at 55 Sienna Street are just some of the places that act as the reminder of the past. During the summer, Singer’s Warsaw Festival showcases live culture from Jewish musicians, authors and artists.

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Go skiing in the middle of the city

To those who know their geography, it comes to no surprise that Warsaw is spread over the Mazovian lowland – however, fans of winter sports don’t have to go all the way to the Tatra mountains to enjoy some quality ski time thanks to Górka Szczęśliwicka, an artificial mountain located in the city center. Almost 75 meters high, it is covered with special dented mats, allowing for year-round skiing and snowboarding.
Drawska 22, Warsaw, Poland, +48 22 162 73 00

Numer 148 #warsaw #warszawa #wwa #gorkaszczesliwicka #skiing #snowboard #competitor #view

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Make it a date under the Rotunda

Where other cities may have main squares or major shopping streets which function as the meeting spot before a crazy night out, Warsaw has its Rotunda. Those who want to feel like true Varsovians should set a date under this circular, modernist building, before heading out to one of the craft beer bars or shot bars in the area.

Have lunch in a milk bar

Having had a revival in recent years, milk bars are a great and cheap way to experience traditional Polish cuisine. Their low prices are guaranteed by government subsidies, while their dishes offer an authentic taste of times gone by, served up by staff working there since the previous political system. History and food in one hit – what’s not to love?

Karkowka 😋😋

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Eat cake!

It is impossible to go a couple of blocks in the city without passing by a cake shop. Cheesecakes, Polish doughnuts and apple pies tempt passersby from window displays. Give in to temptation and enjoy a slice or two of traditional Polish desserts.

Take a water tram

Instead of hopping on a traditional tram or a bus to cross the Vistula River, head over to the river bank near Most Poniatowskiego and jump on a water tram instead. Cruises take place four times a day, exclusively on the weekends and holidays and from July 1 to August 31, and also on Fridays.